Tag Archives: William Mackinnon

WILLIAM MACKINNON exhibition reviewed in The Washington Post

27 May

the washington post logo

May 27 at 10:57 AM

William MacKinnon

Although many of his paintings don’t include cars, William MacKinnon’s style could be termed “automotive chiaroscuro.” The pictures in the Australian artist’s “I Am Beginning to See the Light” often center on a small patch of visible road or outback at night, illuminated by headlights or street lamps. Other around-midnight scenes in the Morton Fine Arts show include “The Great Indoors,” which depicts a house glowing from within and a porch supporting a string of blue lights that resembles a misplaced constellation. The even inkier “There Is a Darkness” discloses little more than a red swoop — perhaps a dirt road — on the lower left and a star cluster on the upper right.

The preponderance of black in MacKinnon’s compositions endows drama, but it also serves to unify the various techniques and media. The artist employs oil, acrylic and auto-body enamel in the same pictures and contrasts precise rendering with looser brushwork that verges on abstraction. The distinction reflects the divide between man-made and natural: Lush vegetation and night skies inspire a freer hand. It also reflects the moods of an artist who writes, “Each day I come into the studio feeling different.” Rather than harmonize these emotions, he juxtaposes them extravagantly, under the cover of darkness.

William MacKinnon: I Am Beginning to See the Light On view through June 2 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

 

 

Click HERE to view available works by WILLIAM MACKINNON.

 

‘I Am Beginning to See the Light’ A solo exhibition of paintings by WILLIAM MACKINNON

17 May
Exhibition on view through June 2nd,  2016
EXHIBITION LOCATION
Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009

HOURS
Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm

Sunday 12pm-5pm

About I Am Beginning to See the Light
MACKINNON states that “Painting for me is a way of thinking…an open-ended sort of intuitive tinkering and discovery. Each day I come into the studio feeling different. I often leave notes from the end of the previous day as a clue of how to proceed. But since then, a lot has happened. I feel different…Sleep, dreams, what I have seen on my drive to work or along the coast, and my feelings all creep into my artwork. I try to bring this new version of myself into the next phase of the painting…that “quick thinking” which draws on everything you have seen and felt and read and looked at in a lifetime. In the end, all of my paintings are self portraits.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

About WILLIAM MACKINNON

Born in 1978 in Melbourne, Australia, WILLIAM MACKINNON earned his BA from Melbourne University, his MFA for Victorian College of the Arts and his Post Graduate Diploma from the Chelsea School of Art and Design in London.  I Am Beginning to See the Light marks MACKINNON’s third solo exhibition in North America, all of them at Morton Fine Art in Washington, DC.
MACKINNON’s many accolades include exhibiting as a finalist in the Basil Sellers Art Prize at the Ian Potter Museum of Art at the University of Melbourne in both 2014 and 2016. He has also been a finalist multiple times for both the prestigious Fleurier Landscape Prize and Arthur Guy Memorial Prize at the Bendigo Regional Art Gallery. His artwork can be found in the permanent collections of Ian Potter Museum, Melbourne University, State Library of Victoria,Joyce Nissan Collection, Artbank, Griffith University, Macquarie Bank Collections RACV and Stonnington Council Collections.

Born into a family legacy of internationally renowned fine artists, MACKINNON participated in a noteworthy three generation exhibition, Landscape of Longing: Shoreham 1950-2012, at the Mornington Pennisula Regional Gallery in Australia which included a number of works by his mother, KATHERINE HATTAM (b. 1950) and his grandfather, HAL HATTAM (b.1913 d.1994).

WILLIAM MACKINNON sold out show “Internal Weather” featured in The Adelaide Review

10 Mar

the adelaide review

William Mackinnon Exhibits Internal Weather

William-Mackinnon-Slow-Down-Detail-Adelaide-review

In his latest exhibition, Internal Weather, which sold out pre-opening, William Mackinnon uses scenes of landscapes combined with observations from everyday life to convey the feeling of what it’s like to be in the world now and more specifically what it’s like to be Australian.

“I really want to get across my experience and the feelings associated with these places,” Mackinnon says. “It’s not really representational of a place; it’s almost more a psychological feeling of going somewhere or leaving.”

The works carry with them a sense of nostalgia as Mackinnon is interested in his own personal experiences of the world. He uses the local scenery of places like Lorne where he has had a beach house for 15 years, as a starting point, adding elements from TV and advertising.

For example, travelling to Los Angeles influences the work Strange Country. The black silhouettes represent trees as seen from the Eames house looking through to Malibu Beach and the cartoon-like, or collage-looking, trees are inspired by Lorne.

“It’s trying to capture the complexity of the experience of all these things – the simultaneity of what it is to be alive,” Mackinnon says. “Although it’s a seemingly beautiful picture, there are rips in the water and the sun is incredibly hot.”

Other works such as The Great Indoors (ii), Summer in Mullimbimby is a painting of a friend’s house where he has stayed a number of times.

“It’s stuff we have an emotional investment in; it’s not an inanimate house.”

The image is immediately familiar and captures the essence of summer.

William-Mackinnon-The-great-indoors-ii-Mullimbimy-768x858

The Great Indoors (ii) Mullimbimy

The works are deliberately unpolished with Mackinnon particularly interested in the natural evolution of the paintings. He doesn’t know how they are going to turn out; he starts off with an idea and each day a new part develops.

“I like there to be a record of all the decision-making and the indecision and the thinking,” he says. “I want all that life and energy and the accumulation of time to be evident.”

Mackinnon describes his earlier work as being much more eclectic with lots of different influences, but over time his work has become more personal.

“I’m much more interested in what’s immediately around me and what’s inside my head and combining those two things. This show really is a good example of that.”

For Mackinnon, painting has always been the main medium and he prefers to work on a large scale, as the viewer can’t look at it all at once.

“I’m trying to communicate a feeling and the curiosity of looking,” he says. “I want the viewer to enjoy the playfulness of the quality of the paint and the scale. Also, to see the works beautifully lit in a gallery is a nice experience and it can’t be beaten.”

William Mackinnon
Internal Weather
Hugo Michell Gallery
Until Saturday, March 12
wmackinnon.com

 

Title image: William MacKinnon, Slow Down (Detail)

KATHERINE HATTAM: DESIRE FIRST 1978–2015 at Deakin University Art Gallery, Melbourne, Australia

8 Sep
 

Deakin University Art Gallery warmly invites you to the official opening of

KATHERINE HATTAM:
DESIRE FIRST 1978–2015

To be opened by Judith Brett, political historian and
Emeritus Professor of Politics, La Trobe University

Thursday 17 September
6.00 pm for 6.20 pm speeches
Function will conclude at 8.00 pm

Free floor talks with the artist and exhibition curator
Wednesday 30 September at 12.30pm
and Friday 16 October at 12.30pm

RSVP essential by Friday 11 September
via http://engage.deakin.edu.au/katherinehattam

This exhibition surveys the work of Melbourne-based artist Katherine Hattam,
from the early drawings of her first exhibition at the Ewing & George Paton
Galleries at The University of Melbourne in 1978 through an evolving practice
that also encompasses collage, printmaking and sculpture. In a practice that has
extended over five decades, Hattam has developed a distinctive register of recurring
motifs, in particular the chair and other domestic objects, which she combines
with references to literature, feminism, family politics, art history and modern
psychoanalysis in the creation of beguiling and personally symbolic works.
The exhibition catalogue includes an essay by curator Emma Busowsky Cox
and is prefaced by Patrick McCaughey.

Cover image: The doctor’s dilemma, 2007 (detail) Book pages, fabric, charcoal and mixed media on paper, 130 x 120 cm.
Collection of the artist. Image courtesy of the artist and Daine Singer. Photography: Simon Peter Fox

Exhibition dates: 9 September to 16 October 2015
Deakin University Art Gallery, Deakin University Melbourne Burwood Campus
221 Burwood Highway Burwood 3125 Melways Ref 61 B5
T :03 9244 5344 F :03 9244 5254 E: artgallery@deakin.edu.au
Hours Tuesday – Friday 10 am4 pm Free Entry
Please visit deakin.edu.au/art-collection for more details.
For information about parking on campus,
please visit deakin.edu.au/parking.

Creating an appreciation for Arts – A Multi-Generational Approach

14 Jul

Creating an appreciation for Arts 

By Martina Dodd

We may not have all grown up around art or been born into a family of artists and creatives like Maya Asante Freelon and William Mackinnon, but that shouldn’t stop us from surrounding our family with paintings, photography and sculpture. Creating an appreciation for the arts at a young age not only improves observation and cognitive skills but can also enhance a child’s understanding of history and culture.  Trips to museums and visits to art galleries with your family can be a rewarding experience for you as well.  A child’s perspective of a piece of art can sometimes be even more inspiring than an art historians!  So let their imagination run free, especially with series drenched in memory, spiritual connects and self-discovery like Kesha Bruce’s “The Guardians” or Maya Freelon Asante’s “Handmade”.

Kesha Bruce, Soliis Journey Home, 48"x48", mixed media on canvas

Kesha Bruce, Soliis Journey Home, 48″x48″, mixed media on canvas

 

Maya Freelon Asante, Handmade, 36"x37", tissue ink monoprint

Maya Freelon Asante, Handmade, 36″x37″, tissue ink monoprint

 

Parents and educators can also use art as a fun and creative teaching platform.  Through Victor Ekpuk’s use of Nsibidi, an indigenous African system of writing, a child can be introduced to cultural traditions and new ways of communication.

Victor Ekpuk, Asian Uboikpa (Hip Sista) Series #11, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 60"x48"

Victor Ekpuk, Asian Uboikpa (Hip Sista) Series #11, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 60″x48″

Or they can learn about the brightly colored deep sea animals and florescent habitants which inspired some of Julia Fernandez Pol’s paintings.

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5"x18.5", bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5″x18.5″, bas-relief hand painted monoprint

 

With the help of Andrei Petrov you can also teach a geography lesson based off of pieces like “Istanbul” and “Swiss Bliss” which loosely resemble European landscapes.

Istanbul Not Constantinople  30x48

Andrei Petrov, Istanbul, 30″x48″, oil on canvas

 

Andrei Petrov, Swiss Bliss, 42"x42", oil on canvas

Andrei Petrov, Swiss Bliss, 42″x42″, oil on canvas

 

 

By instilling an interest, understanding and love for art who knows what the next generation of artists and collectors will create or develop? And maybe during your next visit to Morton Fine Art they can help pick out your newest piece of art work!

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, http://www.mortonfineart.com, mortonfineart@gmail.com

Australian Artist WILLIAM MACKINNON in The Surfer’s Journal

12 May

Please enjoy this wonderful 10 page spread on Australian contemporary artist WILLIAM MACKINNON in The Surfer’s Journal.

Contact Morton Fine Art for available artwork by this internationally renowned painter. (202) 628-2787, http://www.mortonfineart.com, mortonfineart@gmail.com

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

Gallery

Morton Fine Art – Booth #216 at Aqua Art Miami 14

4 Dec

This slideshow requires JavaScript.