Tag Archives: rosemary feit covey

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY reviewed in the Washington Post

1 Jul

In the galleries: Digital and traditional media join forces

Museums

June 30, 2017

 

 


Rosemary Feit Covey’s “Gingko,” mixed media on canvas, on view at Morton Fine Art. (Rosemary Feit Covey/Morton Fine Art)

Rosemary Feit Covey

Nature teems in Rosemary Feit Covey’s large mixed-media paintings. Hundreds of pink and red fish school in spirals, and uncountable yellow ginkgo leaves cover most of a deep blue background. Yet the Washington artist has doubts about the fecundity she depicts. Her Morton Fine Art show is titled “The Planet Is a Delicate Thing.”

Covey’s skills include woodblock printing, whose carving technique she incorporates into low-relief pictures that are partly engraved and partly painted. This array’s epic, “Black Ice,” is an immersive eight-panel tableaux; it fills the gallery’s longest wall with blue-and-white ice floes on a darker-than-wine sea. The dramatic Arctic oceanscape, like the polar bear on the adjacent wall, was inspired by a trip to northern Norway.

The artist doesn’t directly portray ecological disasters, although this show includes one of the bone-pile pictures she has exhibited at Morton before. But global warming menaces the polar scenes, and those fish are fleeing the oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout. Covey’s responses to such disasters are both expansive and exquisitely detailed.

Rosemary Feit Covey: The Planet Is a Delicate Thing On view through July 9 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

Please click HERE to view available artwork by ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY.

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ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY’s solo “The Planet is a Delicate Thing” opens at MFA Fri 6/16

7 Jun
The Planet is a Delicate Thing
Experimental Printmaking by ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY

Friday, June 16th – July 5th, 2017

 

OPENING DAY RECEPTION
Friday June 16th, 6pm-8pm
The artist will be in attendance.

ARTIST TALK
Saturday, June 24th, 2pm

 


ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY, Fish, 2017, 72″x60″, wood engraving & painting on canvas
EXHIBITION LOCATION
Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009
HOURS

Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm-5pm

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY, Ginkgo, 2017, 48″x72″,
wood engraving & painting on canvas



About The Planet is a Delicate Thing
In The Planet is a Delicate Thing, internationally renowned artist ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY explores the balance between climate, the environment, and human life through large-scale mixed media works. Covey, who uses natural landscape and seascape as inspiration for her work, reminds us how delicate and nuanced life can be. The Planet is a Delicate Thing celebrates COVEY, experimental printmaker and artist, who is widely collected internationally and in the DC metropolitan area and has artwork in numerous permanent museum collections around the globe.


About ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. In a career spanning four decades she has exhibited internationally and received countless awards. Ms. COVEY is the recipient of both a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship and Alpha Delta Kappa Foundation National Fine Art Award. Her work is featured in numerous major museum and library collections, including the former Corcoran Gallery of Art, the New York Public Library Print Collection, the National Museum of American History, Yale University, Johns Hopkins Evergreen Museum, Harvard University, Tweed Museum, and the Papyrus Institute in Cairo, Egypt.

In 2012, five hundred of her prints were acquired for the permanent collection of Georgetown University Library, Special Collections. ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY is represented by Morton Fine Art in Washington, DC. The Planet is a Beautiful Thing is Ms. COVEY’s fifth solo exhibition at MFA.

About Morton Fine Art

Founded in 2010 in Washington, DC, Morton Fine Art (MFA) is a fine art gallery and curatorial group that collaborates with art collectors and visual artists to inspire fresh ways of acquiring contemporary art. Firmly committed to the belief that art collecting can be cultivated through an educational stance, MFA’s mission is to provide accessibility to museum-quality contemporary art through a combination of substantive exhibitions and a welcoming platform for dialogue and exchange of original voice. Morton Fine Art specializes in a stellar roster of nationally and internationally renowned artists as well as has an additional focus on African American and African art. 
 

 
Contact Information
(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart@gmail.com
www.mortonfineart.com

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY at CultureSummit 2017 Abu Dhabi

17 Mar

CultureSummit 2017

Participants

April 9–13, 2017 Abu Dhabi

Participants

The faculty for the event will be experienced, well-known, world-class artists and cultural leaders who will have shaped the program and who will chair sessions and help guide them to productive conclusions. The event has already generated extraordinary interest, commitments to attend from representatives of over 50 countries worldwide, and the participation of some of the world’s most prominent arts organizations, performers, visual artists, media, tech, philanthropy, and government leaders.

Cultural Diplomat Award Winners

Madeleine Albright

Former U.S. Secretary of State

Sesame Workshop

represented by Sherrie Westin, EVP of Global Impact & Philanthropy

Producers of Sesame Street worldwide

El Sistema

represented by Eduardo Mendez, Executive Director Simon Bolivar Music Foundation

Creators of the El Sistema Youth Orchestra Program

The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

represented by Tabare Perlas, General Manager

The Arab-Israeli Orchestral Initiative

Participating Countries: 

Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, China, Columbia, Cote D’ Ivoire, Cuba, Czech Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Macedonia, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Phillipinnes, Poland, Senegal, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Request an Invite

Attendance at this event is by invitation only. If you are an artist, public official, media or technology executive and would like to inquire about this event, please click here.

©2017 CultureSummit

Morton Fine Art’s “Handmade” reviewed in the Washington Post

12 Nov

In the galleries: Tales that unfold from the folding of paper

November 11 

 

 

the-washington-post-logo

 

Natalie Cheung’s “Finding Anna 1,” 2016, four 12"x12", watercolor and gouache on paper, at Morton Fine Art. (Natalie Cheung/Morton Fine Art )

Natalie Cheung’s “Finding Anna 1,” 2016, four 12″x12″, watercolor and gouache on paper, at Morton Fine Art. (Natalie Cheung/Morton Fine Art )

Handmade

All six artists in Morton Fine Art’s “Handmade: Made by Hand” are showing works on paper, yet not all of them give a sense of handicraft. The surface appears pristine in Avi Gupta’s muted photographs of home interiors, which focus on light and shadow, and in Natalie Cheung’s blue-on-white renderings of leaves, which intentionally resemble cyanotypes. The skin is harder worked in Rosemary Feit Covey’s large, mysterious pictures of bone piles, which are partly engraved and partly painted, and layered with glue and polymer.

Julia Mae Bancroft literally stitches together her “Mending Moments” collages, sewing wool, hemp and bamboo fibers into the photo-based compositions. Nigerian-born Victor Ekpuk draws and paints on paper, but his imagery employs symbols from an African writing system once incised into wood, metal and ceramics. Nate Lewis literally cuts and scrapes, transforming black-and-white photos of black men with a range of patterns and textures. These vivid, almost sculptural portraits suggest ritual scarification and the tufts of woven fabric. They also signify possible metamorphoses that are more than skin deep.

 Handmade: Made by Hand On view through Nov. 17 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY Artist Residency at Arteles Creative Center in Finland

16 Aug

Congratulations to ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY for her participation in the very competitive artist residency program at Arteles Creative Center in Finland!

arteles_logo

 

Arteles Creative Center in Finland is one of the largest and most international creative residencies in Scandinavia.

Welcoming over 100 selected visual artists/ musicians/ writers/ performance artists/ photographers/ designers / architects per year.
It is an inspiring place to produce original work and collaborate with other energetic and ambitious artists & creative professionals for a concentrated period of time from 1 to 2 months.

Arteles is offering you the possibility to be free to create and to go ‘out of the box’ without having any outside or art world pressure. We encourage experimentation and innovation – and therefore give voice to works that otherwise have nowhere else to be produced or displayed.

Our living and studio spaces are designed to support creative activities and social exchange and we can host 10-12 residents simultaneously.

The center is located in the middle of extraordinary nature of Hämeenkyrö, Finland (European Union Landscape Award in 2009) where you can soak in the fresh air, enjoy the silence, go for wandering walks in the forests, swimming in the many lakes nearby, go skiing and skating at winter time, do hiking and trekking trips in the nearby nature or have daily relaxing in a traditional wood-fire sauna. You can also get to know the fascinating and rich old culture of Finland viewed through Kalevala Epic, full of trolls, witches, myths and its inherent ties with nature.

 

Please click here to view available artwork by internationally renowned artist ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY.

 

Or contact:

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, mortonfineart@gmail.com, http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

Rosemary Feit Covey’s 500 piece collection at Georgetown University Library

19 May
digital georgetown logo
fish-collectionhead
Rosemary Feit Covey’s 500 piece collection at Georgetown University Library. This collection encompasses the entire graphic oeuvre from 1967 to 2010 of the South African-born artist Rosemary Feit Covey. Including some 500 works, the collection was amassed over several decades by Eric Lansdowne Mackenzie and generously donated to Georgetown University Library in 2011.  Mackenzie had published the catalogue raisonné of Covey’s graphic work the previous year, and the descriptive information in these Digital Georgetown records is drawn from his catalog.

 

Encouraged as a high school student by the renowned wood engraver and illustrator Barry Moser, Covey began working in the challenging medium of wood engraving in 1975. The stark linearity and rich darkness of this expressive medium can heighten the psychological effect of the subject and proved the ideal medium for Covey’s imagery. She found that the act of carving into wood required a level of concentration and effort that “drew from a deeper reserve” than the act of painting. Through this intensely physical process she was enabled to bring more deeply felt imagery to the surface, drawn from memories of her youth or daily experience.

Rosemary Feit Covey is a prolific, award-winning artist who maintains a working studio at the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, Virginia. From 2007 to 2008, Covey served as Artist-in-Residence at Georgetown University Medical Center, and in 2014 she had a major retrospective at the Johns Hopkins University’s Evergreen Museum and Library. Her work is represented in the Smithsonian Institution and the New York Public Library, among other public collections.

 
Morton Fine Art
1781 Florida Ave NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart.com

Tips for the Emerging Art Collector

26 Apr

When starting an art collection, purchasing art can be a very daunting task. Many find the idea of it intimidating and overwhelming. However, the truth is that it doesn’t have to be that difficult. There are all kinds of ways in which art collecting is open to everyone…one just needs to take that first step. Art isn’t always a $10 million painting and you don’t always have to find it in a gallery in New York City.  This post is going to share some tips on how to begin your journey down the fun path of collecting art.

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5"x18.5", bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5″x 18.5″, bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Tip #1: Buy art you like/love/couldn’t live without.

This is the first thing any collector will tell you. There is nothing like a regretted purchase, especially when it comes to art. That is why it is strongly suggested that you buy works that really speak to you. When buying a work of art, you want to make sure that it is something that you will still want to look at after it’s been on your wall for some amount of time. Works that make you stop and notice something new in them every time you look are the best kinds of works. If you see a piece in a gallery and you can’t stop thinking about it or continuously go to see it, that’s probably the art collector inside telling you something. At Morton Fine Art, we have the option of taking art works out on approval so that you can hang them in your home/office for a short period of time to get a feeling of what it would be like living with the piece.

Self goggles 4 - 8x10 - oil on mylar web

Charles Williams, Self Portrait with Goggles 4, 10″x8″, oil on mylar

Tip #2: Artwork doesn’t have to match your sofa. Or other pieces in your in collection.

This is a good follow up to the “Buy art you love” tip. It can be a touchy subject as on a few occasions, some people have come into the gallery looking for something to match a piece of furniture or a wall in their space. While it is really awesome when works of art match, it can stifle the creative freedom that makes art collecting fun. Buying your first piece of art doesn’t have to dictate the direction your collection will go. You can mix landscapes with figurative works, abstracts with realism. For example, works on paper are a great way to keep  In the end, it’s really about how they make you feel. Your art collection is a story about you and the experiences you’ve had in your life time.

Trance Dance, 2002, 26"x19", oil and pastel on handmade paper

Trance Dance, 2002, 26″x 19″, oil and pastel on handmade paper

Tip #3: More often than not, art IS in your budget.

A lot of potential collectors get scared off from buying art because they automatically assume the works are going to be out of their price range. Stories from auction houses about works that sell for millions don’t help alleviate this misconception. There are different ways galleries can help you figure out how to buy your first piece. When you are going to a gallery to buy art for the first time, don’t be afraid to ask questions. Also, keep in mind that certain factors will determine the price of a piece. Medium for example, can dictate the price of an artwork. From my own personal experience, I’ve built my collection (which include works by Vonn Sumner, Katherine Hattam, Nathaniel Donnett and Kesha Bruce) around buying works on paper because I find that they fit within my budget more so than works on canvas. That shouldn’t, however, prevent you from figuring out which mediums you like best.

Other ways can be through extended payments. For example, art works can be put on payment plans. Galleries will break up the cost of a piece into more easily payable payments over a 2-3 month period. This is helpful because it will help you budget and feel more secure in your art purchase. However, don’t always assume a gallery will offer you a plan. If you are really interested in a piece, ask the gallerist about their financial options.

If you are interested in starting your art collection or are looking to add something new to your already started collection, please contact the gallery. New collectors, ask about our New Collector Initiative!