Tag Archives: rosemary feit covey

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY exhibits “In Print” at Portsmouth Art & Culture Center

27 Feb
Rosemary Feit Covey, Fish, 2017, 72"x60", mixed media on canvas

Rosemary Feit Covey, Fish, 2017, 72″x60″, mixed media on canvas




Portsmouth Art & Cultural Center

400 High Street

Portsmouth, VA 23704-3622






Wednesday – Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.


PORTSMOUTH, VA – The Portsmouth Art & Cultural Center, located in historic Olde Towne Portsmouth, Virginia kicks off their exhibition season offering two new exhibits during an opening reception on Friday, March 2 from 5:00-8:00 p.m.  Portsmouth Here & Now II celebrates the creativity of those who work or live in the Portsmouth community.  In Print pulls artists from across the United States to present an exhibition that explores the innovative ways that contemporary artists have expanded upon printmaking techniques to create original fine art prints and mixed media works for the display.   The First Friday music series features Matt Thomas on acoustic & harp guitar.

In Print offers some of the longstanding and popular printmaking techniques; lithography, intaglio or etching, drypoint, woodcut or wood engraving, aquatint and soft-ground etching.  Over the last century, newer techniques such as serigraphy or screen-printing, collograph, mono-printing and photo-etching along with combinations of all of the above have enriched the printing techniques that artists use today.  New surfaces have also expanded how artists print and present their work.  Featured are many examples of these processes presented by prominent artists and printmakers Charles Beneke, Rosemary Feit Covey, Staci Katsias, Clay McGlamory, Althea Murphy-Price, Amanda Outcalt-Hoyt, Nicole Pietrantoni, Jenny Robinson, Tanja Softić, and Dominica Webb.  In Print continues through May 28, 2018.


Please click HERE to view available artwork by ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY.

Contact Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009 for acquisition.

(202) 628-2787




ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY Featured in the James Renwick Alliance Craft Quarterly, Winter 2018!

6 Feb

Artist ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY is featured in the upcoming print and online editions of the Winter 2018 issue of the James Renwick Alliance Craft Quarterly. You can get a sneak peek below. To see available work by Rosemary, please visit our website or stop in and see us at the gallery!

Rosemary Renwick 1 web

Rosemary Renwick 2 web

Rosemary Renwick 3 web

Rosemary Renwick 4 web

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY’s wood engraving “Vanity” on view at Yale University Art Gallery

2 Jan

Morton Fine Art is proud to announce that ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY’s wood engraving “Vanity” is on display at the Yale University Art Gallery.

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY, Vanity, wood engraving

Rosemary Feit Covey
South African and American, born 1954
Wood engraving
Edition 35/80
In this domestic tableau, the dressing room and table of Washington D.C.–based printmaker Rosemary Feit Covey are transformed into the stage set for a vanitas—traditionally, a type of still-life painting in which skeletons, skulls, and decaying objects serve to caution against the transience of earthly pleasures. One of the premier wood engravers of the contemporary period, Covey here makes an allegory of herself by drawing a parallel between the artist’s laborious process of direct carving into a wood block to render the black-and-white portrait and her similarly difficult work of maintaining the appearance of youth and beauty, with the aid of colorful makeup and jewelry.
Self-Portrait Prints from the Jane N. Haslem Collection
Curator’s Statement
Scholars have debated whether William Shakespeare’s well-known words “This above all, to thine own self be true,” spoken by the courtier Polonius to his son Laertes in the first act of Hamlet, were meant ironically. In any case, the words were not directed at artists. But when we look at an artist’s self-portrait, we assume that he or she is conveying something truthful—even if, indeed, the image is clearly ironic, as is Robert Arneson’s self- portrait as a classical bust, or if the artist refers to the biblical story of Salome, as does Larry Day, or if the figure appears in the age-old guise of an allegory of Vanity, as does Rosemary Feit Covey. Covey’s print, in fact, speaks to one of the fundamental reasons artists make self- portraits: to assert, in defiance of the skeletal figure lurking behind each of us, “I am here,” in the present, and—even more importantly—in the future, “I was here.”
These works, selected from a recent gift to the Gallery from Jane N. Haslem of sixty-eight printed self-portraits by twentieth-century American artists, range in mood from contented to haunted, in tone from earnest to sardonic, in composition from a straightforward head and shoulders to the complex scenarios of John Wilde or Peter Milton. They vary significantly in size, and they were produced by a broad gamut of printmaking media— woodcut, etching, engraving, drypoint, and lithography. Yet, with all of these variations, each print persuades us that it is true to the artist’s self.
Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009
(202) 628-2787



ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY reviewed in the Washington Post

1 Jul

In the galleries: Digital and traditional media join forces


June 30, 2017



Rosemary Feit Covey’s “Gingko,” mixed media on canvas, on view at Morton Fine Art. (Rosemary Feit Covey/Morton Fine Art)

Rosemary Feit Covey

Nature teems in Rosemary Feit Covey’s large mixed-media paintings. Hundreds of pink and red fish school in spirals, and uncountable yellow ginkgo leaves cover most of a deep blue background. Yet the Washington artist has doubts about the fecundity she depicts. Her Morton Fine Art show is titled “The Planet Is a Delicate Thing.”

Covey’s skills include woodblock printing, whose carving technique she incorporates into low-relief pictures that are partly engraved and partly painted. This array’s epic, “Black Ice,” is an immersive eight-panel tableaux; it fills the gallery’s longest wall with blue-and-white ice floes on a darker-than-wine sea. The dramatic Arctic oceanscape, like the polar bear on the adjacent wall, was inspired by a trip to northern Norway.

The artist doesn’t directly portray ecological disasters, although this show includes one of the bone-pile pictures she has exhibited at Morton before. But global warming menaces the polar scenes, and those fish are fleeing the oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout. Covey’s responses to such disasters are both expansive and exquisitely detailed.

Rosemary Feit Covey: The Planet Is a Delicate Thing On view through July 9 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

Please click HERE to view available artwork by ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY.

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY’s solo “The Planet is a Delicate Thing” opens at MFA Fri 6/16

7 Jun
The Planet is a Delicate Thing
Experimental Printmaking by ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY

Friday, June 16th – July 5th, 2017


Friday June 16th, 6pm-8pm
The artist will be in attendance.

Saturday, June 24th, 2pm


ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY, Fish, 2017, 72″x60″, wood engraving & painting on canvas
Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009

Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm-5pm

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY, Ginkgo, 2017, 48″x72″,
wood engraving & painting on canvas

About The Planet is a Delicate Thing
In The Planet is a Delicate Thing, internationally renowned artist ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY explores the balance between climate, the environment, and human life through large-scale mixed media works. Covey, who uses natural landscape and seascape as inspiration for her work, reminds us how delicate and nuanced life can be. The Planet is a Delicate Thing celebrates COVEY, experimental printmaker and artist, who is widely collected internationally and in the DC metropolitan area and has artwork in numerous permanent museum collections around the globe.


ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. In a career spanning four decades she has exhibited internationally and received countless awards. Ms. COVEY is the recipient of both a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship and Alpha Delta Kappa Foundation National Fine Art Award. Her work is featured in numerous major museum and library collections, including the former Corcoran Gallery of Art, the New York Public Library Print Collection, the National Museum of American History, Yale University, Johns Hopkins Evergreen Museum, Harvard University, Tweed Museum, and the Papyrus Institute in Cairo, Egypt.

In 2012, five hundred of her prints were acquired for the permanent collection of Georgetown University Library, Special Collections. ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY is represented by Morton Fine Art in Washington, DC. The Planet is a Beautiful Thing is Ms. COVEY’s fifth solo exhibition at MFA.

About Morton Fine Art

Founded in 2010 in Washington, DC, Morton Fine Art (MFA) is a fine art gallery and curatorial group that collaborates with art collectors and visual artists to inspire fresh ways of acquiring contemporary art. Firmly committed to the belief that art collecting can be cultivated through an educational stance, MFA’s mission is to provide accessibility to museum-quality contemporary art through a combination of substantive exhibitions and a welcoming platform for dialogue and exchange of original voice. Morton Fine Art specializes in a stellar roster of nationally and internationally renowned artists as well as has an additional focus on African American and African art. 

Contact Information
(202) 628-2787

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY at CultureSummit 2017 Abu Dhabi

17 Mar

CultureSummit 2017


April 9–13, 2017 Abu Dhabi


The faculty for the event will be experienced, well-known, world-class artists and cultural leaders who will have shaped the program and who will chair sessions and help guide them to productive conclusions. The event has already generated extraordinary interest, commitments to attend from representatives of over 50 countries worldwide, and the participation of some of the world’s most prominent arts organizations, performers, visual artists, media, tech, philanthropy, and government leaders.

Cultural Diplomat Award Winners

Madeleine Albright

Former U.S. Secretary of State

Sesame Workshop

represented by Sherrie Westin, EVP of Global Impact & Philanthropy

Producers of Sesame Street worldwide

El Sistema

represented by Eduardo Mendez, Executive Director Simon Bolivar Music Foundation

Creators of the El Sistema Youth Orchestra Program

The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

represented by Tabare Perlas, General Manager

The Arab-Israeli Orchestral Initiative

Participating Countries: 

Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, China, Columbia, Cote D’ Ivoire, Cuba, Czech Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Macedonia, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Phillipinnes, Poland, Senegal, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Request an Invite

Attendance at this event is by invitation only. If you are an artist, public official, media or technology executive and would like to inquire about this event, please click here.

©2017 CultureSummit

Morton Fine Art’s “Handmade” reviewed in the Washington Post

12 Nov

In the galleries: Tales that unfold from the folding of paper

November 11 





Natalie Cheung’s “Finding Anna 1,” 2016, four 12"x12", watercolor and gouache on paper, at Morton Fine Art. (Natalie Cheung/Morton Fine Art )

Natalie Cheung’s “Finding Anna 1,” 2016, four 12″x12″, watercolor and gouache on paper, at Morton Fine Art. (Natalie Cheung/Morton Fine Art )


All six artists in Morton Fine Art’s “Handmade: Made by Hand” are showing works on paper, yet not all of them give a sense of handicraft. The surface appears pristine in Avi Gupta’s muted photographs of home interiors, which focus on light and shadow, and in Natalie Cheung’s blue-on-white renderings of leaves, which intentionally resemble cyanotypes. The skin is harder worked in Rosemary Feit Covey’s large, mysterious pictures of bone piles, which are partly engraved and partly painted, and layered with glue and polymer.

Julia Mae Bancroft literally stitches together her “Mending Moments” collages, sewing wool, hemp and bamboo fibers into the photo-based compositions. Nigerian-born Victor Ekpuk draws and paints on paper, but his imagery employs symbols from an African writing system once incised into wood, metal and ceramics. Nate Lewis literally cuts and scrapes, transforming black-and-white photos of black men with a range of patterns and textures. These vivid, almost sculptural portraits suggest ritual scarification and the tufts of woven fabric. They also signify possible metamorphoses that are more than skin deep.

 Handmade: Made by Hand On view through Nov. 17 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.