Tag Archives: mixed media art

Newport Art Museum to present Miniature World Making At-Home Workshop with Artist Sally Curcio

3 Aug

 

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Newport Art Museum to present Miniature World Making At-Home Workshop with Artist Sally Curcio
By WhatsUpNewp Crew –
July 31, 2020

Newport, RI – Newport Art Museum invites makers of all ages to participate in an at-home Miniature World Making workshop with artist Sally Curcio. Miniature World Making is $30, or $25 for Museum members, and includes a kit complete with materials needed to build your own miniature world inspired by the work of Sally Curcio, along with a link to a special video demonstration by the artist. The deadline to reserve a kit is Sunday, August 9, and kits can be picked up at the Museum during normal open hours beginning August 14. Miniature World Making is appropriate for any age, though adult supervision is recommended for small children. Reservations are available for purchase at newportartmuseum.org/events/miniatureworldworkshop.

Six of Sally Curcio’s miniature worlds are on view as part of Newport Art Museum’s current exhibition, Complex Terrain(s). Curcio has exhibited her work in galleries, museums, and for public installations throughout the United States and internationally. She has shown at numerous museums including the Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York City; the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut; the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem; and the Fitchburg Art Museum in Fitchburg. Curcio’s work is in the permanent collections of Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts; the Fitchburg Art Museum, Fitchburg, Massachusetts; and the University Museum of Contemporary Art at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

In 2019, Curcio was selected as Lead Artist by the Sheikha Manal Little Artists Program at Art Dubai, United Arab Emirates. She has taught workshops inspired by her art at institutions such as the Children’s Museum of the Arts, New York City; Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone, New York City; Girls Inc., Holyoke, Massachusetts; boys and girls schools throughout Dubai; and at Art Dubai as part of the Sheikha Manal Little Artists Program, United Arab Emirates. Curcio maintains her studio in Northampton, Massachusetts.

The Washington Post ~ In the galleries: Rosemary Feit Covey

16 Oct
WP

Written by Mark Jenkins October 4, 2019

Rosemary Feit Covey

There’s a pleasing symmetry between what Rosemary Feit Covey depicts and how she depicts it. Most of the works in “The Dark Re-Imagined,” the Alexandria artist’s show at Morton Fine Art, begin with wood engraving. The white-on-black images are usually supplemented with painted colors and sometimes built up with thread or small found objects. But the incised lines are fundamental, and apt for conveying such hidden natural systems as a fish skeleton or a network of submerged fungi.

AmethystDeceivers_web

‘Amethyst Deceivers 11’ (2019) by Rosemary Feit Covey. Wood engraving, thread, painting on canvas, 36″x 48″ 

Feit Covey has worked with doctors and scientists — including at Georgetown University Medical School’s morgue — so her art is grounded in biological knowledge. Yet the works in this show are not mere illustrations. They attempt to convey the abundance of life, the inevitability of death and the link between the two. In such intricate compositions as the swirling “Fish,” the individual blurs into the collective, much as dead things are reabsorbed into living ones. Like a clump of black earth, Feit Covey’s pictures are dark but fecund.

 

Follow this link to view Available Artwork by Rosemary Feit Covey on MFA’s website.

 

Rosemary Feit Covey’s available work is stored on site at Morton Fine Art, stop by anytime during open hours or make an appointment to view these incredible creations up close in person.  Wednesday – Saturday : 12 – 5pm,  Sunday – Tuesday : by appointment Contact:  mortonfineart@gmail.com -or- (202) 628-2787.

 

 

LAUREL HAUSLER’s “Dogtown” reviewed in The Washington Post

29 Jun

 


Laurel Hausler. “Midnight in Dogtown,” 2019. (Laurel Hausler)

Sunday, June 30, 2019

By Mark Jenkins

Laurel Hausler

“Dogtown,” the namesake of Laurel Hausler’s show at Morton Fine Art, is a real place: an abandoned Massachusetts town that literally went to the dogs. But it’s also a state of mind, one that has much in common with the outlook of the Arlington artist’s previous exhibition, “Ghost Stories.”

Like the earlier pictures, these feature spectral presences, mixed-media contrasts and compositions dominated by darkness. So the most surprising of the newer works is “Midnight in Dogtown,” in which a sketchy rendering of a human figure is framed by upside-down black drips and dwarfed by fields of bright orange and red.

The selection includes a few small pieces that employ found objects and encaustic, a mix of wax and pigment. More common, though, are expressionist drawing-paintings that combine pencil marks with oil and gouache. These appear vehement, yet rough in places. It’s as if Hausler leaves openings in case any spirit might seek to enter.

Laurel Hausler: Dogtown Through Wednesday at Morton Fine Art, 52 O St. NW, No. 302.

 

Available Artwork by LAUREL HAUSLER

 

New Arrivals by KATHERINE TZU-LAN MANN

6 Sep

Private Domain, 52″x53″, acrylic and sumi ink on stretched paper

 

Nursery II, 60″x36″, acrylic and sumi ink on stretched paper

 

The Fall, 45″x85″, acrylic and sumi ink on stretched paper

 

Blue Black Water, 60″x90″, acrylic and ink on canvas

 

About KATHERINE TZU-LAN MANN:
“My work’s abstractions arise from the subjects I portray: ecological and geological cycles, processes of chemical corrosion and natural efflorescence. With roots in traditions of Chinese landscape painting, my monumentally sized paintings and installations evolve a fantastic, abstract vision of the natural world.

The paper on which I paint is not only a recognition of a tradition of Chinese painting; it is also a medium of vulnerability and expansiveness, susceptible to crease and tear as well as to collage and collation.
In my most recent work, I hope to live in the tradition of landscape painting, experiencing it for what it has always been: an occasion for radical experimentation and confrontation with the world, in the broadest sense of the term that sustains us.” – KATHERINE MANN, 2017