Tag Archives: MFA Gallery

Currently On View: VONN SUMNER’s “Wall”

19 Jan

vonn-sumner_wall_2017_casein-tempera-on-panel_16-x16-web

VONN SUMNER

Wall, casein and tempera on panel, 16″ x 16″

I’ve been using walls as a motif in my paintings for about 13 years, but I never thought of them as something sinister before this last year. Initially, walls were expedient for my pictorial and psychological purposes: they help define what we reveal and what we conceal; they become visual metaphors for the many mysteries that we carry.
 
Some walls are very beautiful-old brick walls in New York, brightly colored walls in Mexico and Guatemala, ancient walls in Rome-I have loved looking at all of these.I live in the Los Angeles area and there are many interesting walls between the street and buildings, with glimpses of trees sticking up, and I like imagining what is on the other side as I drive past. I love the walls in the backgrounds of paintings, especially those in early Sienese and Florentine Renaissance paintings. Most of the walls I have painted were based on my memory of a brick wall in the backyard of the house I grew up in. So my association with walls was personal and very positive.
But that has, of course, changed in the past year when talk of walls was suddenly and unexpectedly in the news. At first it sounded ridiculous, even humorous, as I did not really take it seriously. Then I was reminded that as long as we have been building walls, we have been using them to keep people on the other side of them-out of fear. I realize now that my romantic relationship to walls is a very privileged one. Now I am very sad that this wall idea, long a cliché, has become current once again. They are, of course, pointless in the end, merely symbolic-always begging to be toppled.
-VONN SUMNER, January 2017

Currently On View: New Works by NATHANIEL DONNETT

17 Jan

philando_webNATHANIEL DONNETT

Philando, graphite, synthetic and real hair on paper, 11.5″ x 11.5″

Oscillating between abstraction inspired by the Ndebele people of South Africa and social concerns of police brutality, NATHANIEL DONNETT creates thoughtful mixed media narratives titled Philando and Eric. He includes the use of hair as a medium and as a cultural communicative expression.
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NATHANIEL DONNETT
Eric, graphite, synthetic and real hair on paper, 12″ x 12″

New Works by ANDREI PETROV

13 Jan
Based in New York City, ANDREI PETROV explores memory in his organic abstract paintings. His paintings probe the distortion, incompleteness and rare moments of clarity in the shadows of memory. Each piece portrays the intrinsic struggle and selective inclusion or exclusion of details in the process of recollection. At times, sharpness occurs in the rear of the picture plane while the out of focus, obscured areas, exist in a larger scale toward the foreground and make reference to the inscrutable nature of long and short term memory.
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ANDREI PETROV, Exodus, 2017, 25″x40″, oil on canvas
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ANDREI PETROV, Untitled 1, 20″x30″, oil on canvas

LAUREL HAUSLER solo exhibition “Strawberry Moon” opens Friday Sept 23, 2016

8 Sep

 

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LAUREL HAUSLER, Pink Debs, 2016, 12″x12″, encaustic, oil and graphite on cradled wood panel

 

 

Strawberry Moon
A solo exhibition of paintings by LAUREL HAUSLER

Friday, September 23rd – October 6th, 2016

OPENING DAY RECEPTION
Friday, September 23rd, 6pm-8pm
The artist will be in attendance.

 

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LAUREL HAUSLER, Teddy Bear, 2016, 12″x12″, encaustic on cradled panel

 

EXHIBITION LOCATION

Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009

HOURS

Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm-5pm

 

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About LAUREL HAUSLER

A Washington, DC native, Laurel Hausler’s love of literature, antiquity, unsolved mysteries and the obscure inspire the stories behind her work. Working in a subtractive and additive process, she creates the surface of her paintings in encaustic, oil and graphite. Admired for resisting a self-conscious approach to process, Hausler reveals lines, veils and gestures on her surfaces that demonstrate her decision-making process through the work’s evolution to its finished state.
We walk on air, Watson.
There is only the moon, embalmed in phosphorous. – SYLVIA PLATH
On a Strawberry Moon, the night glows with berries in summer, debutante balls and the blurry
incandescent splendor of glamour in decline. – LAUREL HAUSLER

CLICK HERE to view available artwork by LAUREL HAUSLER.

10 Minutes with DC Artist NATALIE CHEUNG

21 Jul

Photo credit: Joy Asico

JULY 21, 2016 in The Journal by Shinola

10 MINUTES WITH DC ARTIST NATALIE CHEUNG

Our D.C. store’s newest art installation is by artist Natalie Cheung (pictured).

Chance occurences that happen in nature are what drive artist Natalie Cheung to create new artwork. Her latest art installation can be found inside our Washington D.C. store (1631 14th St. NW). At 8 x 12 feet, this work is the largest piece of artwork she’s ever shown. We sat down with Natalie to ask what it was like creating this masterpiece.

Join us at our in-store event to meet Natalie July 27 from 6-8 p.m. at our Logan Square store. Enjoy sips, snacks and a talk from the artist. No RSVP is needed.

Natalie Cheung’s artwork inside our D.C. store.

How long have you been a contemporary artist? Please describe your work’s aesthetic.

Growing up in the DC area, I had a lot of exposure to museums and the arts programs, and I’ve always been drawn to visually interesting and creative activities.  I am formally educated as a fine art photographer with a BFA from the Corcoran College of Art + Design, and a MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University. Ever since my schooling, I have been a working artist.

What inspires you to create and where do you feel most inspired?

A lot of my work is framed around chance occurrence that exist in nature, so I always feel compelled to make new artwork after taking a long hike or being exposed to new kinds of natural environments. I’m inspired by the small details and flaws in nature, and how together, they build a larger picture of the world we live in.

Natalie Cheung.

Describe your artwork that’s inside of our D.C. Store. What is it called and how did you create it?

At 8 x 12 feet, the work I have in the Shinola D.C. store is the largest artwork I have ever shown. I saw this as an opportunity to create a somewhat experimental installation. The black and white image is of a paper cut photogram (a camera-less photographic darkroom technique) I had cut.

The Rock Paper Scissors series is a blending of my cultural upbringing and my observations as a formally educated photographer. The idea of creating my own take on my mother’s intricate Chinese New Year paper-cuts photographically came to me when I saw a photograph of a city apartment building in a full black silhouette. The image was of an apartment facade, but completely abstracted at the same time. My paper cut compositions are spontaneous and intuitive shapes similar to those found in nature and man-made structures.

Get directions to our Washington D.C. store, here.

To read the article in entirety, here.

 

To view available artwork by NATALIE CHEUNG, please click here.

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

mortonfineart@gmail.com, (202) 628-2787, http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

KESHA BRUCE’s (Re)calling & (Re)telling on view at The Smithsonian National Museum of American History

12 Jul
KESHA BRUCE, That They Might Be Lovely,  2008, Hand-signed and numbered Archival Pigment Print.

KESHA BRUCE, That They Might Be Lovely, 2008, Hand-signed and numbered Archival Pigment Print.

 

Photographs from (Re)calling & (Re)telling are
currently on view at The Smithsonian National
Museum of American History as a part of
Through the African American Lens.

The exhibition features some of the more than 33,000
artifacts that have been collected by the Smithsonian’s
National Museum of African American History and
Culture (NMAAHC) since its creation in 2003.

Through the African American Lens is the NMAAHC’s
8th exhibition and is on display at the Smithsonian’s
National Museum of American History until
NMAAHC opens to the public on September 24, 2016.

Covering topics such as education, military service,
popular culture, religion, sports, and visual arts, the
exhibition demonstrates how the African American
story is quintessentially an American one of
determination, faith, perseverance, pride, and resilience.

Through the African American Lens
Smithsonian National Museum of American History
Washington, D.C.

 

Contact Morton Fine Art for available artwork by KESHA BRUCE.

Morton Fine Art

1781 Florida Ave NW

Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787

http://www.mortonfineart.com

mortonfineart@gmail.com

New artwork by JULIA MAE BANCROFT

25 Jun
We are proud to announce the arrival of new artworks by DC based artist JULIA MAE BANCROFT.  A graduate of the Corcoran College of Art & Design, Bancroft intricately and thoughtfully hand-stitches her mixed media artworks on paper. Each piece incorporates natural fibers including hemp, Merino wool and bamboo to complement her figurative monoprint drawings which are also laced with oil paint, watercolor paint and conte crayon. A typical artwork in her series Mending Moments takes 50-60 hours to complete.

About Mending Moments:

Mending Moments is a title that describes both the literal process and conceptual ideas behind the artwork I make. I carefully “mend” the surface of my images by stitching various fibers directly into the paper by hand, rearranging its parts and binding the pieces back together to form a new ethereal moment for reflection.”

-Julia Mae Bancroft, 2016

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Please contact Morton Fine Art for additional details on acquiring artwork by JULIA MAE BANCROFT

 

Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart.com
mortonfineart@gmail.com

Hours:  Tuesday through Saturday 11 am – 6 pm and Sunday 12 – 6pm