Tag Archives: Maya Freelon Asante

MAYA FREELON ASANTE site-specific installation in DC

21 Jun

Amazing site-specific installation by MAYA FREELON ASANTE soon to be unveiled in DC! This five pod piece was custom created for the space and is comprised of tissue and ink Ubuntu quilts. Simply stunning!

 

About MAYA FREELON ASANTE

Maya Freelon Asante is an award-winning visual artist whose work was described by the late poet Maya Angelou as “visualizing the truth about the vulnerability and power of the human being.” Cosmopolitan magazine featured her in June 2015 in “Art Stars,” calling her one “of the most [interesting] female artists in the biz.”

She was commissioned by Google to design original art for their OnHub router. Her unique tissue paper art, praised by the International Review of African American Art as “a vibrant, beating assemblage of color,” has been exhibited internationally, including shows in Paris, Jamaica, Madagascar, and Italy.

She was selected by Modern Luxury Magazine as Best of the City; by Huffington Post as “Black Artists: 30 Contemporary Art Makers Under 40 You Should Know“; and by Complex magazine as “15 Young Black Artists Making Waves in the Art World.”
Maya has completed residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Korobitey Institute in Ghana, and the Brandywine Workshop in Philadelphia. She earned a BA from Lafayette College and an MFA from the School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Maya is also the daughter of critically acclaimed Architect, Phil Freelon, lead designer of The Anacostia Library, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. She is represented by Morton Fine Art in Washington, DC.

 

Inspiration of MAYA FREELON ASANTE

Ubuntu “I am because we are”

Ubuntu is a classical African concept which can be interpreted as  I Am Because We Are. This notion of togetherness and solidarity resonates through this sculpture, as the joining of the tissue paper illustrates the power of unity.

Independently, a torn piece of paper seems insignificant, but once those pieces are combined with others, the force is overwhelming. By creating monumental, vibrant, sculptures out of tissue paper I am asking the viewers to acknowledge the fragility of humanity and the importance of working together towards a peaceful and harmonious existence.

Ubuntu echoes the African-American traditions of both the patchwork quilts and textiles which stems from resourcefulness and resilience. Each practice reminds us, as Dr. Martin Luther King said, “that I can’t be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be; and you can’t be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be.”

Students, I challenge you to embrace Ubuntu, and find unity in all aspects of your life! We are better together.

– Maya Freelon Asante

Please click HERE for available artwork by internationally renowned artist MAYA FREELON ASANTE.

Morton Fine Art

1781 Florida Ave NW

Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787

mortonfineart@gmail.com

http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

MAYA FREELON ASANTE featured in Callaloo Art & Culture in the African Diaspora

14 Jun
We are proud to announce that artist MAYA FREELON ASANTE has been prominently featured in the journal – Callaloo Art & Culture in the African Diaspora – published by  The Johns Hopkins University Press. Founded in 1976 by Editor Charles Henry Rowell, this renowned journal celebrates 40 years in print.
MAYA FREELON ASANTE’s feature can be found in Volume 38, Number 4, Pages 801-804 and 896-898. Some of you may recognize your acquisitions featured!
Contact Morton Fine Art for the full pdf version. 
Morton Fine Art
1781 Florida Ave NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart@gmail.com

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Tips for the Emerging Art Collector

26 Apr

When starting an art collection, purchasing art can be a very daunting task. Many find the idea of it intimidating and overwhelming. However, the truth is that it doesn’t have to be that difficult. There are all kinds of ways in which art collecting is open to everyone…one just needs to take that first step. Art isn’t always a $10 million painting and you don’t always have to find it in a gallery in New York City.  This post is going to share some tips on how to begin your journey down the fun path of collecting art.

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5"x18.5", bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5″x 18.5″, bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Tip #1: Buy art you like/love/couldn’t live without.

This is the first thing any collector will tell you. There is nothing like a regretted purchase, especially when it comes to art. That is why it is strongly suggested that you buy works that really speak to you. When buying a work of art, you want to make sure that it is something that you will still want to look at after it’s been on your wall for some amount of time. Works that make you stop and notice something new in them every time you look are the best kinds of works. If you see a piece in a gallery and you can’t stop thinking about it or continuously go to see it, that’s probably the art collector inside telling you something. At Morton Fine Art, we have the option of taking art works out on approval so that you can hang them in your home/office for a short period of time to get a feeling of what it would be like living with the piece.

Self goggles 4 - 8x10 - oil on mylar web

Charles Williams, Self Portrait with Goggles 4, 10″x8″, oil on mylar

Tip #2: Artwork doesn’t have to match your sofa. Or other pieces in your in collection.

This is a good follow up to the “Buy art you love” tip. It can be a touchy subject as on a few occasions, some people have come into the gallery looking for something to match a piece of furniture or a wall in their space. While it is really awesome when works of art match, it can stifle the creative freedom that makes art collecting fun. Buying your first piece of art doesn’t have to dictate the direction your collection will go. You can mix landscapes with figurative works, abstracts with realism. For example, works on paper are a great way to keep  In the end, it’s really about how they make you feel. Your art collection is a story about you and the experiences you’ve had in your life time.

Trance Dance, 2002, 26"x19", oil and pastel on handmade paper

Trance Dance, 2002, 26″x 19″, oil and pastel on handmade paper

Tip #3: More often than not, art IS in your budget.

A lot of potential collectors get scared off from buying art because they automatically assume the works are going to be out of their price range. Stories from auction houses about works that sell for millions don’t help alleviate this misconception. There are different ways galleries can help you figure out how to buy your first piece. When you are going to a gallery to buy art for the first time, don’t be afraid to ask questions. Also, keep in mind that certain factors will determine the price of a piece. Medium for example, can dictate the price of an artwork. From my own personal experience, I’ve built my collection (which include works by Vonn Sumner, Katherine Hattam, Nathaniel Donnett and Kesha Bruce) around buying works on paper because I find that they fit within my budget more so than works on canvas. That shouldn’t, however, prevent you from figuring out which mediums you like best.

Other ways can be through extended payments. For example, art works can be put on payment plans. Galleries will break up the cost of a piece into more easily payable payments over a 2-3 month period. This is helpful because it will help you budget and feel more secure in your art purchase. However, don’t always assume a gallery will offer you a plan. If you are really interested in a piece, ask the gallerist about their financial options.

If you are interested in starting your art collection or are looking to add something new to your already started collection, please contact the gallery. New collectors, ask about our New Collector Initiative!

PHOTOS: Maya Freelon Asante at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s Mosely Gallery

9 Feb

dome small1

Maya Freelon Asante created a beautiful installation for the Black History Month exhibition “History Continues:  Contemporary African-American Artists” which is now on display the University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s Mosely Gallery.

The art display, which runs through March 10, shows “how current events and culture inform the work of contemporary African-American artists,” gallery director Susan Holt said.  “All the artists are young, emerging artists from the Baltimore/Washington area who use quite different materials, themes and approaches, yet contain some connection to the relevance of Black History.”

Artists include:  Michael Booker (University of Maryland 2012), Maya Freelon Asante (School of Museum of Fine Art in Boston 2007), Larry Cook(George Washington 2013), Shaunte Gates, Jeffrey Kent (Maryland Institute College of Art 2010) and Jamea Richmond-Edwards (Howard University 2012).

Companion events accompany the art exhibit.

The Mosely Gallery is free and open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Call 410-651-7770 or visit www.moselygallery.com for more information.

Check out more photos after the jump.

Continue reading

MAYA FREELON ASANTE’s artwork at University of Maryland, Eastern Shore in “History Continues: Contemporary African American Artists

2 Feb

unnamed

 

 

UMES hosts Black History Month exhibit

“History Continues:  Contemporary African-American Artists,” the University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s Black History Month exhibit, opens Feb. 4 with a reception from 4-6 p.m. in the Mosely Gallery.

The art display, which runs through March 10, shows “how current events and culture inform the work of contemporary African-American artists,” gallery director Susan Holt said.  “All the artists are young, emerging artists from the Baltimore/Washington area who use quite different materials, themes and approaches, yet contain some connection to the relevance of Black History.”

Artists include:  Michael Booker (University of Maryland 2012), Maya Freelon Asante (School of Museum of Fine Art in Boston 2007), Larry Cook (George Washington 2013), Shaunte Gates, Jeffrey Kent (Maryland Institute College of Art 2010) and Jamea Richmond-Edwards (Howard University 2012).

Companion events accompany the art exhibit.

The Mosely Gallery is free and open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Call 410-651-7770 or visit www.moselygallery.com for more information.

 

Click here to view available artwork by MAYA FREELON ASANTE.
Artwork is available at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, mortonfineart@gmail.com, http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

MAYA FREELON ASANTE’s amazing artwork featured in Fine Art Focus on Design Sponge

12 Jan

design sponge logo

FINE ART FOCUS: MAYA FREELON ASANTE

exhibitimg
Over the past 12 years of blogging here at Design*Sponge, I’ve read and written about thousands of artists and designers. A small handful will always stand out to me for their innovation and bold choices in color and technique, but few have made a mark as powerful as mixed-media artist,Maya Freelon Asante.

BO-Maya5346
mayafreelonasante_1
Maya is based in Baltimore, MD where she creates absolutely breathtaking installations using tissue paper. After talking last week about the way tissue paper can be used to create things like paper flowers, I love seeing how such a beautiful but humble material can be transformed into something as significant and moving as these pieces that Maya crafts. Back in 2005, Maya discovered a stack of tissue paper in her grandmother’s basement. Water in the basement had leaked into the paper and left a “bleeding” stain that so transfixed Maya that she decided to change her artistic focus to create work with this type of paper. Maya’s work has been shown internationally and is now displayed in the collections of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum and the U.S. State Department. Read on below to learn more about her gorgeous artwork. xo, grace

Artist: Maya Freelon Asante
About: Maya lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland. She received her BA from Lafayette College and her MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Work: Maya is a mixed-media artist who makes stunning, abstract sculptures and installations from tissue paper. Her work was described as, “visualizing the truth about the vulnerability and power of the human being,” by Maya Angelou.
More: You can read more about Maya’s work here, here, here, here andhere.

All artwork (c) Maya Freelon Asante. Images via maya-freelonasante.squarespace.com. Portrait by Greg Powers.

Hand+Made

  1. These images are stunning! I’m smitten with the green piece, and I bet they’re even lovelier in person. And always love seeing artists from my hometown!

  2. Absolutely gorgeous art. It looks like it has so much depth. These would be the perfect starting point for any room design!

    Click HERE to view the article in full.

     

    Contact Morton Fine Art for details and pricing for these featured artworks and others by MAYA FREELON ASANTE.

    http://www.mortonfineart.com, mortonfineart@gmail.com , (202) 628-2787

MAYA FREELON ASANTE’s “Impermanence” reviewed in Washington Post

29 Dec

the washington post logo

 

In the Galleries

by Mark Jenkins

December 23, 2015

 

 

Maya Freelon Asante
Dyed, crumpled tissue paper is the basis for the works in Maya Freelon Asante’s “Impermanence,” but that fundamental material takes many forms at the Morton Fine Art show. The Baltimore artist’s “Evidence/Nothing” series consists of twisted paper forms mounted on wood. Some of the other pieces are prints derived from wetly inked paper spun on a flat wheel. A few compositions incorporate old family photos, a celebration of personal heritage but also an expression of grief over the death of a child.

All of the works hang on the gallery’s walls, but some are partly sculptural. In addition to the ones made of tangled tissue, “Shattered/Whole” arrays seeds and shards of glass atop its pink-spattered paper. Yet Asante demonstrates that 3-D elements are not necessary to effect a sense of depth. The show’s standout is “Dark Matter,” a monoprint whose green and blue forms conjure motion, distance and gem-like facets. It appears both liquid and crystalline, impermanent and eternal.

 

Shattered Whole, 30"x20", tissue paper, ink, glass, seeds and resin

Shattered Whole, 30″x20″, tissue paper, ink, glass, seeds and resin

 

 

Dark Matter, 58"x44", spinning tisue paper ink mono print

Dark Matter, 58″x44″, spinning tisue paper ink mono print

Impermanence: Maya Freelon Asante On view through Jan. 5 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

Click HERE to view available artwork by MAYA FREELON ASANTE.