Tag Archives: mario robinson

MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON’s exhibition at Pratt Institute in NYC

13 Oct
MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON, Peach Tree and Pine, 18″x24″, watercolor on paper

 

Tuesday, Sep 12, 2017 -Friday, Oct 06, 2017
Location
School of Continuing and Professional Studies Gallery, Pratt Manhattan Center, 2nd floor, 144 West 14th Street, New York, NY
Restoration. A solo exhibition of work by Pratt alumnus, Mario Andres Robinson
You are cordially invited to view an exhibition of recent work by Mario Andres Robinson at the School of Continuing and Professional Studies Gallery, Pratt Manhattan Center, New York City.
The exhibition showcases recent work never exhibited in New York before, bringing together portraits, and landscapes focused on architecture.
Robinson’s work fits squarely within the tradition of American painting. His finished works bear a close affinity to the masters of the realist tradition, Andrew Wyeth and Thomas Eakins.
Containing few references to modern life, Robinson’s work has a timeless and universal quality, and exhibits a distinct turn-of-the-century stylistic aesthetic. The images he chooses, which refer to a bygone era where solitude and reflection were abundant, also provoke frequent allusions to the paintings of Winslow Homer and Edward Hopper.
Join Mario Andres Robinson’s course with SCPS this fall:
Painting the Figure in Watercolor
XFA-458

MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON, Transition, 22″x16″, watercolor on paper

 

MARIO ROBINSON’s Book “Lessons in Realistic Watercolor”

21 Apr

We’ve got our copy! Have you got yours? Mario Andres Robinson’s new book “Lessons in Realistic Watercolor” now available on Amazon.com.

Contact Morton Fine Art for available paintings by this master painter!

mario book cover and art

 

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Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, mortonfineart@gmail.com

http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

 

MARIO ROBINSON’s Savvy Painter Podcast

4 Aug

Listen to MARIO ROBINSON interviewed for Savvy Painter Podcast HERE

Mario Robinson

Mario Robinson, Self- portrait

Mario’s work fits squarely within the tradition of American painting. His paintings contain few references to modern life which gives them a timeless and universal quality. The subjects he chooses refer to a bygone era where solitude and reflection were abundant, also provoke frequent allusions to the watercolors of Winslow Homer.

Mario Andres Robinson is an Exhibiting Artist Member of The National Arts Club, The Salmagundi Club, NY and a Signature member of The Pastel Society of America. He is considered a Living Master by The Art Renewal Center. His work has been featured several times in The Artist’s Magazine, The Pastel Journal, Watercolor Magic, Fine Art Connoisseur, American Art Collector and on the cover of American Artist magazine. In the February 2006 issue of The Artist’s Magazine, Mario was selected as one of the top 20 realists under the age of 40. In 2014, Robinson was appointed Brand Ambassador for Winsor & Newton.

In this episode, Mario and I talk about his how an elementary school teacher noticed his artistic talents and took him under her wing. You’ll hear me get completely fascinated by a portrait he made of Spike Lee, his time in the Army and how that sort of separated him from other students at Pratt University. Mario was absolutely intent on being an artist, hell tell you all about how that pushed him to excellence, and drove him to be bold in asking for what he needs.

'Lexie' by Mario Robinson. Listen to Mario talk about his work and career in this interview: http://savvypainter.com/podcast/mario-robinson/ ‎
‘Lexie’
'tougaloo relic' by Mario Robinson Listen to Mario talk about his work and career in this interview:  http://savvypainter.com/podcast/mario-robinson/ ‎
‘tougaloo relic’
'sixteen broad street' by Mario Robinson. Listen to Mario talk about his work and career in this interview: http://savvypainter.com/podcast/mario-robinson/ ‎
‘sixteen broad street’
'transition' by Mario A. Robinson Listen to Mario talk about his work and career in this interview: http://savvypainter.com/podcast/mario-robinson/ ‎
‘transition’

Contact Morton Fine Art for available paintings by MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON.

http://www.mortonfineart.com

mortonfineart@gmail.com, (202) 628-2787

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

 

MARIO ROBINSON’s watercolor demo for Windsor & Newton Artist Spotlight

25 Jun
Master water colorist, MARIO ROBINSON

Master water colorist, MARIO ROBINSON

Watch this amazing video of master water colorist MARIO ROBINSON’s painting process!  It is inspiring to view his technique as well as to hear the artist share his inspiration and the role of reflection and emotion in his rich portrait narratives.

http://www.winsornewton.com/na/discover/videos/for-water-colour/artist-video-spotlight-mario-robinson

New arrivals at Morton Fine Art:

Mario Robinson, Transition, watercolor on paper, 22"x16"

Mario Robinson, Transition, watercolor on paper, 22″x16″

 

Mario Robinson, St. Kitts Masquerade Dancer, watercolor on paper, 16"x20"

Mario Robinson, St. Kitts Masquerade Dancer, watercolor on paper, 16″x20″

 

Please contact the gallery for pricing and availability of artwork by MARIO ROBINSON.

http://www.mortonfineart.com

mortonfineart@gmail.com

(202) 628-2787

Learn Painting Realistic Watercolors from MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON

15 Apr
Mario Andres Robinson, Transition, water color on paper, 22"x16", currently available at Morton Fine Art

Mario Andres Robinson, Transition, water color on paper, 22″x16″, currently available at Morton Fine Art

 

Learn realist techniques every watercolorist should know! Join Mario Robinson as he shares the secrets to radiant watercolor works. Establish your subject’s light, middle and dark values with a tonal underdrawing. Learn proper techniques for stretching your paper to achieve a pristine surface. Create symmetrical features and mass big shapes using intuition to achieve a more natural appearance. Work through a monotone wash, explore water manipulation and work wet into wet for optical color mixing. Finally, build form and dimension into your watercolor with a special drybrush technique. Discover the keys to luminous, expressive watercolor paintings today!

mario

Mario Robinson, Instructor of Painting Realistic Watercolors

Mario Robinson developed his realist style while studying at the prestigious Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Moved by the works of Rembrandt, Vermeer and Degas, Robinson himself is now considered a master watercolorist. He is an exhibiting artist member of The National Arts Club, an artist member of The Salmagundi Club and a signature member of The Pastel Society of America. His work has been featured in various publications, including The Artist’s Magazine and American Art Collector, and on the cover of American Artist magazine. He has been named one of the top 20 realist artists under the age of 40.

More than 100 artists are currently enrolled!  For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.craftsy.com/class/painting-realistic-watercolors/3978?uo=4.8.2014-blog&_ct=4.8-sbqii-hekdtkf-rbew&_ctp=3978

MFA artists on display at African American Museum Dallas

20 Nov

Here are a few shots of works by Jules Arthur, Kesha Bruce, and Mario Andres Robinson currently displayed in an exhibition at the African American Museum in Dallas, Texas!

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REVEALING THE AFRICAN PRESENCE IN RENAISSANCE EUROPE – NY Times review of the Walters’ show

12 Nov
Be sure to catch Morton Fine Art & Galerie Myrtis’ “Contemporary Response” exhibition when in Baltimore. The NY Times wrote this glowing review on “Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe” currently on view at the Walters Museum. This exhibition runs in Baltimore through mid January at 2013 and then moves to Princeton University for its FINAL run (minus the precious Durer drawing in the Walter’s presentation of the show). BOTH shows are MUST SEES. Please support our contemporary voices – its worth the trip!
‘African Presence in Renaissance Europe,’ at Walters Museum – NYTimes.com

A Spectrum From Slaves to Saints

Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid ,“The Three Mulattoes of Esmereldas” (1599) is one of the works in “Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe,” at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore.

By

Published: November 8, 2012

BALTIMORE — In a fall art season distinguished, so far, largely by a bland, no-brainer diet served up by Manhattan’s major museums, you have to hit the road for grittier fare. And the Walters Art Museum here is not too far to go to find it in a high-fiber, convention-rattling show with the unglamorous title of “Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe.”

Visually the exhibition is a gift, with marvelous things by artists familiar and revered — Dürer, Rubens, Veronese — along with images most of us never knew existed. Together they map a history of art, politics and race that scholars have begun to pay attention to — notably through “The Image of the Black in Western Art,” a multivolume book project edited by David Bindman and Henry Louis Gates Jr. — but that few museums have addressed in full-dress style.

Like the best scholarship, the Walters show, organized by Joaneath Spicer, the museum’s curator of Renaissance and Baroque art, is as much about questions as answers, and makes no bones about that. Many wall labels begin with an interrogative, suggesting that a museum visitor’s reading of a particular image carries as much weight as the curator’s.

And, like most ambitious but risky undertakings, it has flaws. There is evidence of budget limitations. Although no corners were cut in getting crucial European loans, the catalog — a good one — has come in a third smaller in size than planned and with signs of changes-at-the-last-minute production.

The presence of a chatty “resource center” midway through the show, with gamelike audience-participation activities on offer, will rile museum purists. (I have no problem with it.) And, in a show that tackles the issue of race head-on, the line between an objective view of the past taken on its own terms and interpretation of it in light of the present can sometimes feel precariously drawn.

But in the end none of this matters. The show is so interesting to look at and so fresh with historical news as to override reservations. It does what few museum shows ever do: It takes a prized piece of art history, one polished to a glow by generations of attention, and turns it in an unexpected direction, so it catches the searching, scouring rays of new investigative light.

Europe’s ties to Africa were ancient but sporadic. Particularly strong bonds were forged during the heyday of the Roman Empire. And in the 15th and 16th centuries, the period covered by the Walters show, they were renewed. True, as early the eighth century a pocket of intercontinental culture had sprung up in Muslim-occupied southern Spain. But it wasn’t until that occupation was coming to a close that a broader exchange began.

By the mid-1400s an expansionist Europe was hungry for new materials and markets, and a globally minded Roman Catholic Church sought new members. Well before Vasco da Gama first sailed around Africa, Portuguese merchants had opened trading depots along its west coast. And enterprising Africans were coming to Europe.

In 1484 a Congolese delegation visited Lisbon on a diplomatic mission, and Ethiopian Christian pilgrims were establishing permanent communities in Rome.

Superficially Africa and Europe had embarked on an age of cosmopolitan rapport, an idea promoted in art. It was during this period that the convention was introduced of including a black African as one of the three foreign kings in images of the Adoration of the Magi. A beautiful early-16th-century Flemish example and one with, exceptionally, two black figures, tenderly particularized, opens the Walters show on a utopian note, with a vision of multicultural harmony.

In reality harmony was rarely associated with Africa in the European mind. Known primarily secondhand from sensationalizing ancient texts, the African continent was often depicted in the Renaissance as a place of freakish beasts and bestial, violence-prone, naturally subject peoples. The attitude found its place in Renaissance decorative objects like oil lamps and door pulls cast in the shape of African heads, and in paintings that routinely included dark-skinned figures as servants or slaves.

Slavery had a long institutional history in Europe, and for centuries most slaves were white, from the eastern Mediterranean and Russia. The source changed with the beginnings of an African slave trade in Europe in the mid-1400s. And the complexion of European art, subtly but surely, changed with it.

 

We find a hint of this in a minutely detailed late-16th-century painting of a city square in Lisbon bustling with black- and white-skinned figures from across the social spectrum. We find it again in an exquisite drawing by Dürer of a demure 20-year-old black woman named Katharina, a slave in the household of a Portuguese patron the artist visited in Antwerp in 1521. And we find it once more in a fragmentary painting by Annibale Carracci. The original picture seems to have been a portrait of an aristocratic woman accompanied by her female slave. But only the likeness of the slave survives, and her face, with its simmering, level-eyed gaze, is unforgettable.

Being a domestic slave in urban Europe was not necessarily a lifelong condition. (The situation was very different on New World plantations.) Slaves could be freed by owners and take up independent professions. The two black men, one young, one older, in a pair of fleet chalk drawings from around 1580 by Paolo Veronese might have worked as his assistants or apprentices, much as the former slave and mixed-race painter Juan de Pareja did in Velázquez’s studio in Madrid.

De Pareja went on to have a painting career of his own, though he is largely remembered as the subject of one of Velázquez’s most magnificent portraits. But in general the names of black sitters in Renaissance paintings — and, no doubt, of black artists — are lost.

Who is, or was, the slightly stunned-looking man wearing drop earrings, a gold chain and pearl-encrusted cap in “Portrait of a Wealthy African,” by an unknown 16th-century German or Flemish artist? Or the regal-looking personage, head swathed in a milk-white turban, in an oil sketch whipped up on a sheet of repurposed accounting paper by Peter Paul Rubens?

Rubens’s sitter is so attractive, we’d love to know his story. And we’d especially love to know the story — the true, gossip-free story — behind the sitter in an Agnolo Bronzino portrait whose name has survived. He’s Alessandro de’ Medici, who ruled Florence for seven years before being assassinated in 1537, and who is thought by historians to have been the illegitimate child of a pope-to-be, Clement VII, and a black or biracial woman.

Alessandro’s dark skin was remarked on by contemporaries, who nicknamed him Il Moro (the Moor), a generic term for African in 16th-century Italy. In Bronzino’s painting the subject’s complexion is inconclusively ruddy. But another portrait, this one of the ruler’s young daughter Giulia, has been cited by some scholars, who point to the child’s black facial features, as confirmation of Alessandro’s ethnic heritage.

Together these portraits probably attest to the reality of African DNA flowing through Medici blood, and through the very center of the European High Renaissance. But they are at least as interesting for the reactions they have provoked. Until recently art history has ignored, denied or at best tiptoed around their racial content, just as it has skimmed over the black presence in Europe as a whole. The Walters exhibition not only asserts that presence, but positions it as a contributing factor to a crucial moment in the forming of European cultural identity.

By the early 17th century that moment seemed to have passed. Europe’s attention turned to the Americas and to Asia. Africa became what it had started out being for Europe: a supply center for natural resources and cheap labor. Old attitudes of fear and disdain toward Africa — still the dominant view in the West — returned and hardened.

So: Renaissance followed by regression is the show’s bottom-line theme. Or is it? One of the saving graces of art — what keeps you coming back to it — is that it isn’t a bottom-line business. You think you’ve come to an end, a conclusion, and there’s always more: the exception, the extension. And so it is in this case: African Europe lived on, in new places, and in new guises.

Toward the end of the show, in a 1599 painting called “The Three Mulattoes of Esmereldas,” we see three dark-skinned men in European court attire but also wearing large gold nose ornaments and holding spears. The painting, now in the Prado, was done in Spanish colonial Ecuador. It depicts a father and his two sons, descendants of African plantation slaves and New World natives, who were leaders of an Afro-Indian community. In this painting, commissioned from an Ecuadorean artist as a gift to Philip III of Spain, they present to Europe as what they are: related, different, equal.

African Europe also continued to flourish on home turf in, among other places, popular religion. The exhibition’s final image is a resplendent 18th-century carved wood sculpture of a Roman Catholic saint, Benedict of Palermo (1526-89), who was born into a family of African slaves in Sicily, led an exemplary life as a Franciscan monk there, and was canonized in 1807.

This saint is sometimes referred to as Benedict the Moor or Benedict the African, and in the sculpture his racial identity is emphatically conveyed: his grave face and extended hand are a rich ebony black, their darkness framed and amplified by the brilliant gilding of his robe.

By the time this sculpture was carved around 1734, Benedict had long since attracted an ardent following, in Europe, in the colonial Americas and in Africa. Today he’s the official patron saint of African-America, with churches in his honor from Bahia to the Bronx. And images of him, no matter how stylistically varied, continue to combine traces of Renaissance Europe and of Africa. In him the two are inseparable, are one.