Tag Archives: Installation Art

The Washington Post features MAYA FREELON and AMBER ROBLES-GORDON

4 May

In the galleries: ‘Interact + Integrate’ requires audience participation

By: Mark Jenkins

Fabric scraps and damaged tissue paper are the essential ingredients of new work now at Morton Fine Art. Those materials might sound negligible, but Amber Robles-Gordon and Maya Freelon employ them with ambition and impact.

Bubble2_web

MAYA FREELON, Bubble 2, tissue ink monoprint, 44″x 74″

Freelon’s technique began with what her statement calls a “beautiful accident”: finding colored tissue paper stained by water from a leaking pipe. From this discovery, the North Carolina artist developed a method of bleeding pigment from moistened colored tissue onto sheets of white paper, which are so thick they hang as if they’re fabric.

The larger works in “Rebirth/Rebound” were made with a pottery wheel, so the transferred hues spin with verve and grace. The dominant color is often magma-dark red, framed by black and green and white bubbles that evoke the images’ aquatic origins. The most direct print, “Suspension,” is mostly orange and yellow, which flow with the exuberance of a classic abstract-expressionist canvas. Freelon’s accident yields pictures that are assured and bold.

3-2_web

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON, Kepler 19-b Super Earth, mixed media on paper, 36″x 36″ 

Robles-Gordon, a D.C. native, is known for hanging strands of textiles and other found objects in intricate arrangements. The pieces in her “Third Eye Open” are wall-mounted rather than suspended, and feature circular drawing-collages orbited by smaller rounded objects, some partly covered in bits of garments. The forms suggest zygotes and planets, as well as eyes, but at the heart of each of the larger circles is a leafy motif. Whether seen as cosmic or botanical, the artist’s circling compositions exalt natural cycles.

Maya Freelon: Rebirth/Rebound and Amber Robles-Gordon: Third Eye Open Through May 15 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

You can view all available artwork by these talented artists here on our website! 

MAYA FREELON ASANTE site-specific installation in DC

21 Jun

Amazing site-specific installation by MAYA FREELON ASANTE soon to be unveiled in DC! This five pod piece was custom created for the space and is comprised of tissue and ink Ubuntu quilts. Simply stunning!

 

About MAYA FREELON ASANTE

Maya Freelon Asante is an award-winning visual artist whose work was described by the late poet Maya Angelou as “visualizing the truth about the vulnerability and power of the human being.” Cosmopolitan magazine featured her in June 2015 in “Art Stars,” calling her one “of the most [interesting] female artists in the biz.”

She was commissioned by Google to design original art for their OnHub router. Her unique tissue paper art, praised by the International Review of African American Art as “a vibrant, beating assemblage of color,” has been exhibited internationally, including shows in Paris, Jamaica, Madagascar, and Italy.

She was selected by Modern Luxury Magazine as Best of the City; by Huffington Post as “Black Artists: 30 Contemporary Art Makers Under 40 You Should Know“; and by Complex magazine as “15 Young Black Artists Making Waves in the Art World.”
Maya has completed residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Korobitey Institute in Ghana, and the Brandywine Workshop in Philadelphia. She earned a BA from Lafayette College and an MFA from the School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Maya is also the daughter of critically acclaimed Architect, Phil Freelon, lead designer of The Anacostia Library, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. She is represented by Morton Fine Art in Washington, DC.

 

Inspiration of MAYA FREELON ASANTE

Ubuntu “I am because we are”

Ubuntu is a classical African concept which can be interpreted as  I Am Because We Are. This notion of togetherness and solidarity resonates through this sculpture, as the joining of the tissue paper illustrates the power of unity.

Independently, a torn piece of paper seems insignificant, but once those pieces are combined with others, the force is overwhelming. By creating monumental, vibrant, sculptures out of tissue paper I am asking the viewers to acknowledge the fragility of humanity and the importance of working together towards a peaceful and harmonious existence.

Ubuntu echoes the African-American traditions of both the patchwork quilts and textiles which stems from resourcefulness and resilience. Each practice reminds us, as Dr. Martin Luther King said, “that I can’t be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be; and you can’t be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be.”

Students, I challenge you to embrace Ubuntu, and find unity in all aspects of your life! We are better together.

– Maya Freelon Asante

Please click HERE for available artwork by internationally renowned artist MAYA FREELON ASANTE.

Morton Fine Art

1781 Florida Ave NW

Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787

mortonfineart@gmail.com

http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

JASON SHO GREEN – Video of 3 Robotic Art Installations in Germany

28 Mar
Jason Sho Green's "Wanderlust" by night

Jason Sho Green’s “Wanderlust” by night

"Wanderlust" detail

“Wanderlust” detail

Jason Sho Green's "Wanderlust" by day

Jason Sho Green’s “Wanderlust” by day

Don’t miss this video of JASON SHO GREEN’s innovative and interactive robotic art installation! Three minutes of video cover three installations he produced during his recent artist residency in Germany. Incredible!

Nathaniel Donnett’s ZZZ’s reviewed

10 Jan
Photo credit: Nathaniel Donnett

Photo credit: Nathaniel Donnett

December 17th, 2012 – Carrie Marie Schneider

ZZzzzzzz by Nathaniel Donnett was the result of his one-week residency at Art League Houston as part of the group show/mini residency STACKS, curated by Robert Pruitt. On opening night for STACKS, the five participating artists—Phillip Pyle II, Nathaniel Donnett, Jamal Cyrus, M’kina Tapscott and Autumn Knight—were clad in gray hazmat suits while they inventoried, announced, axed and fed collected objects that their offerers felt represented “blackness” into a wood chipper. Each subsequent week one of these artists is invited to use the remnants in their own exhibition.

In a panel discussion for ZZzzzzzz, Pruitt framed STACKS as a way to make public and tangible the conversations he’d been having with his peers, as well as a way to defy the lack of expectation and exhibition of rigorous conceptual work and theory-based investigations by black artists, “to show that we talk about what they do not think we are thinking about.” When asked whether continuing to rehash and redefine “Black Art” only continues black artists’ confinement to an expected loop, Pruitt said it is the conversation that matters.

On that note, I’d like to point out that the talk for ZZzzzzzz was rare in two ways: 1. It was a participatory performance work that asked to hear about the participants’ experiences. 2. It was a panel discussion that actually included discussion.

Nathaniel Donnett was the second STACKS artist to have his go. His first choice of medium was time travel, but barring that, dreams were the next best thing.

Inspired by Carl Jung’s writing and his St. Elizabeth experiment (to determine if African Americans had a different consciousness than white Americans), Donnett led a week chock full of investigations around the idea of “Black Imagination.” It started with inviting four people, two artists and two collectors, to spend the night in the gallery space. They slept, attempted to sleep, or cursed Donnett for sleep deprivation to a soundtrack he created from lectures, found sounds and music. “Donnie Darko” also played.

Continue reading the article here

zz n6 donnett photo credit

zz n9 donnett photo credit