Tag Archives: GA Gardner

GA GARDNER Curates International Art Exhibition in Paris, France

5 May

 

We are very excited to share GETTHRU’s newest project with Boxout, exhibiting in Paris, France.  ‘Mixed Bag: An International Small Works Exhibition’ curated by Morton Fine Art’s own GA GARDNER is made possible by Gethru.org and the fundraising arm of the nonprofit organization!  Boxout provides art collectors with access to international works of art by making the original works available for sale through local galleries, art fairs and art spaces.

About the Exhibition:

Title:  Mixed Bag: An International Small Works Exhibition
Curator:  GA Gardner
Gallery:  59 Rivoli
Venue:  Paris France, www.59rivoli.org

Date: April 28 to May 8, 2016

Mixed-BAG-Paris-Card

 

Also check out this write up by Olive Vassel about the exhibition on euromight.com!

sunday_arts_guardianParis-show_april2016

 

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Tips for the Emerging Art Collector

26 Apr

When starting an art collection, purchasing art can be a very daunting task. Many find the idea of it intimidating and overwhelming. However, the truth is that it doesn’t have to be that difficult. There are all kinds of ways in which art collecting is open to everyone…one just needs to take that first step. Art isn’t always a $10 million painting and you don’t always have to find it in a gallery in New York City.  This post is going to share some tips on how to begin your journey down the fun path of collecting art.

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5"x18.5", bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5″x 18.5″, bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Tip #1: Buy art you like/love/couldn’t live without.

This is the first thing any collector will tell you. There is nothing like a regretted purchase, especially when it comes to art. That is why it is strongly suggested that you buy works that really speak to you. When buying a work of art, you want to make sure that it is something that you will still want to look at after it’s been on your wall for some amount of time. Works that make you stop and notice something new in them every time you look are the best kinds of works. If you see a piece in a gallery and you can’t stop thinking about it or continuously go to see it, that’s probably the art collector inside telling you something. At Morton Fine Art, we have the option of taking art works out on approval so that you can hang them in your home/office for a short period of time to get a feeling of what it would be like living with the piece.

Self goggles 4 - 8x10 - oil on mylar web

Charles Williams, Self Portrait with Goggles 4, 10″x8″, oil on mylar

Tip #2: Artwork doesn’t have to match your sofa. Or other pieces in your in collection.

This is a good follow up to the “Buy art you love” tip. It can be a touchy subject as on a few occasions, some people have come into the gallery looking for something to match a piece of furniture or a wall in their space. While it is really awesome when works of art match, it can stifle the creative freedom that makes art collecting fun. Buying your first piece of art doesn’t have to dictate the direction your collection will go. You can mix landscapes with figurative works, abstracts with realism. For example, works on paper are a great way to keep  In the end, it’s really about how they make you feel. Your art collection is a story about you and the experiences you’ve had in your life time.

Trance Dance, 2002, 26"x19", oil and pastel on handmade paper

Trance Dance, 2002, 26″x 19″, oil and pastel on handmade paper

Tip #3: More often than not, art IS in your budget.

A lot of potential collectors get scared off from buying art because they automatically assume the works are going to be out of their price range. Stories from auction houses about works that sell for millions don’t help alleviate this misconception. There are different ways galleries can help you figure out how to buy your first piece. When you are going to a gallery to buy art for the first time, don’t be afraid to ask questions. Also, keep in mind that certain factors will determine the price of a piece. Medium for example, can dictate the price of an artwork. From my own personal experience, I’ve built my collection (which include works by Vonn Sumner, Katherine Hattam, Nathaniel Donnett and Kesha Bruce) around buying works on paper because I find that they fit within my budget more so than works on canvas. That shouldn’t, however, prevent you from figuring out which mediums you like best.

Other ways can be through extended payments. For example, art works can be put on payment plans. Galleries will break up the cost of a piece into more easily payable payments over a 2-3 month period. This is helpful because it will help you budget and feel more secure in your art purchase. However, don’t always assume a gallery will offer you a plan. If you are really interested in a piece, ask the gallerist about their financial options.

If you are interested in starting your art collection or are looking to add something new to your already started collection, please contact the gallery. New collectors, ask about our New Collector Initiative!

GA GARDNER, GETTHRU in The Guardian Trinidad & Tobago

1 Sep

Helping T&T artists GETTHRU

Sunday, August 30, 2015
Curator and artist GA Gardner with artworks by Sarah Knights of T&T, Behzad Mahmoudpour of Iran, Judith Ganz of Germany and Beata Obst of Poland. Images courtesy Getthru.org

Lisa Allen-Agostini interviews T&T artist GA Gardner about his Internet-based arts collective GETTHRU

Q: Tell me about the name GETTHRU. Is it what it sounds like in T&T parlance?
A: “Get thru” is a really commonly used local term here in T&T, but I wanted to narrow this meaning and focus on art. How can one “get thru” via the arts? What are the options for a broader dialog? I wanted to play on this common term and define it in the context of fine arts. When I came back home a few years ago, after over 25 years working in the US, as a professor, artist, book publisher and educational consultant, I brought with me a commitment to art education, especially focused on contemporary art.

I wanted to continue to use art as a tool that can help educate and bridge economic gaps. I wanted to be involved with art activism in countries often under-serviced on the international stage, when it comes to art.  So I founded GETTHRU, a T&T-based non-profit arts organisation.

This organisation creates projects that serve to educate cultures through the arts. It uses art as a teaching tool. The organisation’s first project Thru Contemporary, for example, houses and maintains a permanent juried collection of contemporary fine arts. This project is a collaboration of global artists, writers and curators.

Our mission is to acquire and promote the artworks of prominent contemporary artists from all over the world and share their works with communities who often don’t get a variety of international contemporary art on their home soil. We provide access to these works and create programmes to educate and inform about the collection and its relationship to the local cultures.

In addition we are interested in publishing materials and reaching out to general communities. Through exhibitions we make the collection available to the general public and we are constantly building relationships with galleries, museums and arts spaces around the world to exhibit various complements of this growing collection.

Who are the T&T artists involved in the project and who does what in its organisational structure?
We are constantly reviewing works from artists who submit pieces from around the world, but I must admit that most of the artists I have been following for years, so it was not difficult to begin this selection process. As an artist, I have donated works to the organisation. Additionally we have works from other locals, Adele Todd and Sarah Knights.

We are open to new relationships with established and upcoming artists. I was at a local furniture store on the Avenue and while testing out a chair I looked up and saw the work of Sarah Knights. I liked her work at first sight and two days later was at her home to see more of her art. In the case of Adele Todd I had known her and followed her work for years.  It varies.  These local artists are included in the permanent collection, but are generally not involved in the management of the organisation.

What are the benefits of working as an arts collective, especially in the way you’ve set up GETTHRU as an online collective?
The benefit is access. By working together we are able to move together as one, we are unified in a central belief about art and its importance in influencing cultural and social change. Together the group is stronger. With this strength we have greater access to exhibition spaces globally, as well as funding and possibilities to educate through the arts.

Most of the works in the collection are represented by galleries and are well established but this effort does not take away from the access they have already created with their audience. It simply extends the reach of their message while providing examples that can serve to broaden the definition of art to viewers.

What are some of the goals you have for the organisation? And have you achieved any of them so far?
Beyond the goal to educate through the arts, I would like to be able to work more with local contemporary artists and to continue to build a collection that shakes up the mind of even the most creative person and challenges them to do more and take risks with their art. I would also like to do more in the way of publishing books and catalogs about the collection and do more outreach with the art schools here and abroad.

In addition, I’d like to create more programmes to teach contemporary forms of art in underserved communities. We are also open to partnering with businesses and other organisations to expand our reach and fulfill our mission.

We are on our way. About six months ago we got started with the first ongoing project, Thru Contemporary Arts. Today we have exhibited in Germany, St Croix, and here in T&T, with future exhibitions planned for France and the USA. Our collection is very diverse in medium, from photography to paintings and mixed media. We have contemporary artworks from France, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands, USA, Poland, Hong Kong, Iran and T&T.

What are your thoughts on the T&T contemporary arts scene? Who have you been watching—both in and out of your collective?
We are very talented here in T&T and setting our sights on contemporary art will help to enrich that area. Currently there are only a few collectors that are interested and few national grants available, so there are limited ways for the artists to make a living locally in the contemporary art scene.

Contemporary artists in other countries are often subsidised by the government through grants or stipends. In Berlin, Germany, for an example, contemporary artists survive on art grants and seldom create works for sale to the general public. This art is used to inform and educate or simply to create an experience for the public.

There are galleries and art spaces in T&T that are trying to promote and educate about the depth of contemporary art but without government interest or with limited access to grants, art collectors will determine the success of this movement in T&T and around the world.

More info

www.getthru.org

GA GARDNER’s artwork featured in Moko – Caribbean Arts and Letters

28 Aug

Issue 6 – July 2015

Cover art by Lucien Downes

From April 29 to May 3, Moko had the pleasure of attending the Bocas Lit Fest in Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago. It was an excellent opportunity to come face to face with several of the writers we have been fortunate enough to feature, but it was also exciting to talk to many new writers who we hope to publish in the future. We sincerely believe that our mission is a necessary one given the few spaces that our region’s writers and artists can truly call their own. That belief was reinforced by the numerous submissions we received for our sixth issue, our largest presentation to date.

In Moko Issue 6, Cuban painter Carlos Estevez shares with us “Plenilunio,” an arresting series of works that call to mind both da Vinci’s sketches and the gnosticism of Jorge Luis Borges’s fictions. GA Gardner of Trinidad uses his most recent collages to reconcile the universal aims of abstraction with his interest in exploring cultural identity.

Moko veteran Loretta Collins Klobah shares with us two more poems that weave together themes of love, humor and resistance. Brad Walrond and Jon Euwema both reach for the narrative epic in their lengthy poems, touching on themes of family, migration, loss, politics, and history. Victoria Brown’s memorable vignette of a Trinidadian school-day is sharpened by her sense for character and setting. Puerto Rican writer Lizbette Ocasio-Russe’s story-telling is marked by a sense of fluidity despite its episodic nature, and is told with a similar multi-lingual dexterity.

We are also pleased to feature Sharif El Gammal-Ortiz’s review of the recent documentary Poetry is an Island, creative non-fiction by Danielle Bainbridge, and a brief interview with British Virgin Islands artist Aragorn Dick-Read, who shares both the philosophy behind his striking metalwork as well as some hints regarding his next major project.

And some great news! Moko Co-Founder Richard Georges had the honour of being a finalist for the Hollick Arvon Prize this year! We have been awestruck by the poetry of the other finalists – especially Elliot Bastien, Shivanee Ramlochan, and the very deserving winner Danielle Boodoo-Fortuné, who we had the privilege of publishing in our very first issue. For now, we will content ourselves with anticipating first books by all the finalists! Speaking of first books, the young and effervescent Vladimir Lucien and his debut Sounding Ground has been a revelation, and the OCM Bocas judges felt similarly. Congratulations to all.

This labour of love continues to reward us and we hope Moko continues to bring some joy to you all. We remain open for submissions, and are pleased to announce that we will be welcoming two special guest editors for our next issue. A call for submissions for Issue 7 with more details will be posted next month.

– Richard and David.

 

Visual Art

Paintings by Carlos Estevez

“The moon not only brings about an essential cycle in our existence, but it also illuminates the deep corners of our minds. I hope to share my illuminated vision of life during a recent, particularly prolific period of my career.”

Collages by GA Gardner

“The result is now an explosion of information that is woven together by cultural lines and tells a story about how a group of people are identified, ignored, or celebrated in the media.”

Textiles by Aurora Molina

“Aurora Molina’s works are concerned with the objectivity of woman, presenting women as icons.  Her current work explores the passing of time and aging, and the great deal of importance celebrities play in our everyday life.”

Paintings by Niarus Walker

“The more I work on the series, the more the pieces take on a spiritual connotation as I delve deeper in to the media and the possibilities of meaning. How can a rusty piece of machinery become a spiritual symbol?”

GA GARDNER in The Guardian Trinidad and Tobago

12 Aug

 

Gaurdian Trindid and Tobego logo

Thru shows contemporary works at Art Society

Published:
Sunday, August 9, 2015
T&T-born artist GA Gardner. Images courtesy Thru Contemporary Arts Collection

The Art Society will host the first Thru Contemporary Arts Collection from August 17-21. The exhibition will feature a wide variety of international work including mixed media, photography, embroidery and digital work from Thru Contemporary Arts’ permanent public collection.

“These contemporary works push the envelope and question the essence of what is art,” said a release from Thru Contemporary Arts, which the release describes as “a collaboration of artists, writers and curators.” Thru is a project initiative of the T&T-based non-profit arts organisation GETTHRU.

Contributors to the collection include Adele Todd, GA Gardner and Sarah Knights, all from T&T; as well as Judith Ganz, Germany; Serge Game, the Netherlands; Beata Obst, Poland; Behzad Mahmoudpour, Iran and Stan Squiewell, United States among other countries.
GA Gardner curates the show.

“The Art Society is very pleased to host Thru Contemporary Arts’ exhibition in August 2015. We welcome Dr GA Gardner, who will be curating this very important show of contemporary art at our gallery in Federation Park. It is imperative that the Society puts on shows like these especially for student artists, schoolchildren and university students and for many of our upcoming artists to take full advantage of viewing,” the release quotes Art Society president Clayton de Frietas as saying.

Gardner is the founder of GETTHRU. He said the exhibition will give residents an opportunity to enjoy a curated body of work from Thru Contemporary Art’s collection. Previous exhibitions have been held in Germany and the US Virgin Islands. Thru’s “message is one that will best benefit the people of developing regions such as the Caribbean, where access to an international body of contemporary art is limited,” Gardner said in the release.

Thru Contemporary Arts houses and maintains a juried collection of contemporary art. The organisation acquires and promotes the artworks of prominent contemporary artists. This public collection is exhibited at museums, galleries and spaces with the goal of educating and introducing under-served communities to various forms of contemporary art, the release said. This project focuses on exhibition, education and the preservation of contemporary arts.

The showing opens with a reception at the Art Society, corner Jamaica Boulevard and St Vincent Avenue, Federation Park, on August 17 from 7–10 pm. The event is free and open to the public.

More info

www.gethru.org

Please contact Morton Fine Art for available artwork by GA GARDNER.

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, mortonfineart@gmail.com

http://www.mortonfineart.com

GA GARDNER in “Growth” exhibition at Caribbean Museum Center for the Arts on St. Croix

19 May

 

GA GARDNER, A Struggle to Survive, 43"x42", mixed media on mylar

GA GARDNER, A Struggle to Survive, 43″x42″, mixed media on mylar

Frederiksted, St. Croix – The Caribbean Museum Center for the Arts is excited to announce the opening of Growth, a group exhibition featuring works selected from the international public art collection of Thru Contemporary Arts. Growth will be on view at CMCArts from May 29 – June 27, 2015. Details are below.

Opening Reception at the Caribbean Museum Center for the Arts
Friday, May 29th from 5:00 to 8:00 PM
Free admission. Cash bar and light refreshments provided.

About the exhibition:

Growth is the second exhibition presented by Thru Contemporary Arts. It opens at the Caribbean Museum Center for the Arts on St. Croix and follows a recent, inaugural exhibition in Cologne, Germany. Growth is intended to expand conversation about the nature and boundaries of art in the Caribbean by exposing the public to a variety of approaches to creating contemporary art. It features a specially selected collection of contemporary art by present-day artists from countries around the world. From mixed media art to photography, embroidery, and digital works of art – all are represented in this exhibition, which is part of Thru Contemporary’s permanent public collection.

Thru Contemporary Arts is a project of GETTHRU, a non-profit arts organization based in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago: www.getthru.org

Growth includes works by:

Judith Ganz
GA Gardner
Beata Obst
Adele Todd
Clary Estes
Georg Gartz
Ute Bartel
Lap Yip
Christop Bartolosch
Almuth Baumfalk
Julia Neuenhausen
Sarah Knights

About Thru Contemporary Arts:

Thru Contemporary Arts is a project initiative of the non-profit arts organization GETTHRU, based in Trinidad & Tobago (www.getthru.org). The project is dedicated to showcasing contemporary artists and their work in countries that lack access to nontraditional art forms and techniques.

Thru Contemporary Arts focuses on exhibition, education and the preservation of contemporary arts, and houses and maintains a juried collection. The project acquires and promotes the artworks of prominent contemporary artists at various stages of their careers. This public collection is exhibited at museums, galleries and other spaces with the goal of educating and introducing under-served communities to various forms of contemporary art. As part of this project the organization publishes and prints arts catalogs and books on various contemporary arts subjects. Thru Contemporary Arts is a collaboration of artists, writers, and curators.

To learn more, please visit or contact:

Caribbean Museum Center for the Arts

10 Strand Street & 62 King Street

Frederiksted, St. Croix, USVI 00840

Phone: (340) 772-2622/ Fax: (340) 772-2612

cmcarts@gmail.com

 

This project is funded in part by Virgin Islands Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

C:\Users\Alex\Desktop\Growth\vica_logo.jpg

Please contact Morton Fine Art for available work by GA GARDNER. 

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC, 20009, USA

http://www.mortonfineart.com

(202) 628-2787

mortonfineart@gmail.com

Exhibition Photos of GA GARDNER’s GETTHRU in Cologne Germany

23 Apr

GA GARDNER’s GETTHRU, Thru Contemporary Arts exhibition in Cologne, Germany

At the opening reception for “People Textures Environment” in Cologne Germany, the first exhibition by Thru Contemporary Arts.

www.getthru.org

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