Tag Archives: dc

KATHERINE HATTAM featured in Blouin Art

13 Dec

‘Katherine Hattam: The Grammar of Living’ at Hill Smith Gallery, Adelaide, Australia

‘Katherine Hattam: The Grammar of Living’ at Hill Smith Gallery, Adelaide
Katherine Hattam, “The Grammar of Living,” mixed media on paper, 51 x 83 cm.
(Courtesy: Katherine Hattam and Hill Smith Gallery)

Hill Smith Gallery, Adelaide is hosting “The Grammar of Living,” a solo exhibition of recent works by Katherine Hattam.

Katherine Hattam was dissuaded by her parents from entering art school. They knew the struggle of artists and the path to success that was littered with challenges and setbacks. Hattam attended university, where she enjoyed four years of studying literature and a psychoanalytic theory of politics. “The Grammar of Living” series comprises of university books and study material that reappear in many of the works. Hattam has been exhibiting since 1978. She was Australia China fellow in 2002 and has held solo shows in the Geelong Art Gallery, the Bendigo art gallery, the Warrnambool art gallery, with collections that are a part of National Gallery of Victoria, Art Gallery of South Australia, Art Gallery of New South Wales, and the Heide Museum of Modern Art among others. Hattam is represented by Daine Singer Gallery Melbourne and Art House Gallery Sydney.

Hill Smith Gallery was established in 1982 by Director Sam Hill-Smith, in the Adelaide CBD.  The gallery seeks to introduce discerning collectors to exceptional artists and their work. Genres represented within the program include painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, works on paper, and 3D printed objects. Many of the gallery’s artists’ works have been collected by leading national institutions and appear in notable corporate collections.

The exhibition is on view through December 16, 2017, at Hill Smith Gallery, Adelaide, 113 Pirie Street, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia.

Additional available artworks available in the US at Morton Fine Art, Washington, DC.

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NATE LEWIS featured in Lancaster Online

2 Nov

November 2, 2017
Mosaic Project artist Nate Lewis uses his experience as a nurse in his art

man

Most artists know from the time they are little kids that they will become artists.

Nate Lewis, one of this year’s mosaic artists at Pennsylvania College of Art & Design, knew from the time he was a child that he wanted to be a nurse, like his dad.

He had no idea that his nursing career would become the foundation of his art career.

I was planning to be a nurse since sixth grade,” says Lewis, who grew up in Beaver Falls in western Pennsylvania. “I got good grades, and I played lots of basketball. I didn’t grow up making art at all.”

Lewis will talk about his nontraditional journey as an artist Friday at 2 p.m. And from 6 to 7 p.m., the public can meet Lewis during a First Friday event.

And his exhibit will be on display through Dec. 8, along with one by fellow mosaic artist Amber Robles Gordon.

Music was the first foray into art for Lewis.

“Coming out of college and into my mid-20s was a time where I listened to everything,” he says. “The music spoke to me so much in so many different ways.”

He started playing violin, taking about 8 or 9 lessons and then teaching himself.

“I played two or three hours a day,” Lewis says. “The way I am, when I really like something, I dive in.”

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He moved to Virginia and started working in the intensive care unit of a hospital. Required to take some classes, he started doodling when class got too dull.

This wasn’t actually a breakthrough for him. It was just doodling.

But then his sister, who is a visual artist, saw something in those doodles and for Christmas 2010, she bought him some art supplies and a book about drawing.

“My sister told me to draw what was in front of me, but I found it boring. I knew that I wanted to draw organs and instruments, red blood cells, images from an electronic microscope. That was my world.”

He drew lungs coming out of a trumpet, red blood cells coming out of a pipe.

“I loved it. This is exactly what I wanted to draw.”

His sister loved the images, too, and suggested they make T-shirts.

While he spent his spare time working on the T-shirts, he missed drawing his unique images. So he quit the T-shirt business and began working on his drawings. Two cross-sections of brains that looked like headphones. A bagpipe sitting on top of a stomach.

He was still working in the hospital, where he moved from neuroscience-surgical intensive care to medical-surgical intensive care and to a stroke unit, where he was involved in rehab.

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nate lewis

And his work evolved from the basics of anatomy to a deeper, more intense kind of work.

He began exploring and working with layers of paper, specifically paper from MRIs and CAT scans.

“I was thinking of the rhythms and records of people’s lives. I thought about vulnerability, empathy and care. You’ve got such an intimate relationship with patients and family members. I don’t think I will have a more intimate relationship. These are vulnerable and tragic times for people.”

As art took over his life, Lewis stopped working as a nurse and now devotes himself to exploring new ideas and expanding on older ideas.

“I wanted to add life to my work, not just the hospital,” Lewis says, noting that he has been influenced by his brother-in-law, who is also a visual artist.

Lewis is now thinking about history and African-American figures and narratives.

“I’ve started using African-American figures and thinking about empathy and what is empathy outside of the hospital. Empathy is not a passive thing. It is very active. So I am educating myself on unknown histories, with things I have been unaware of.

“I’m adding life to movement and then I am thinking about textures in bodies. Tensions past, present and future.”

He will keep evolving.

“As time goes on, I try to understand more and more by using empathy, understanding and caring,” Lewis says. “My work was physically taking care of people, and I see everybody with this lens.”¶

 

LAUREL HAUSLER’s “No Trace of the Woman”/ FRANCES GLESSNER LEE and “The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death”

18 Oct

As many of you may recall, artist LAUREL HAUSLER created an exciting series of paintings and sculptures of felted wood in her solo exhibition “No Trace of the Woman” inspired by FRANCES GLESSNER LEE’s 1940’s dollhouse rendering of “Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death”, composite crime scene models recreated on a one-inch-to-one-foot scale. Inspired by Glessner Lee’s visionary and zealous passion for forensics in a time when women were unable to become detectives, Hausler selects needles and fiber as her medium to honor traditional notions of “women’s art” or “craft”, mirroring Glessner Lee’s own meticulous attention to detail, down to every last hand-crafted clue, of the “Nutshell Studies”.

 

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About LAUREL HAUSLER:
A Washington, DC native, LAUREL HAUSLER‘s love of literature, antiquity, unsolved mysteries and the obscure inspire the stories behind her work.  Working in a subtractive and additive process, she creates the surface of her felt sculpted paintings by layering strands of felted wool. Admired for resisting a self-conscious approach to process, Hausler reveals lines, veils and gestures on her surfaces that demonstrate her decision-making process through the work’s evolution to its finished state.
Please contact Morton Fine Art for acquisition of artwork from “No Trace of the Woman”.
Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009
(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart@gmail.com

 

Opening Friday, October 20, 2017 at the Renwick Gallery      

(Smithsonian American Art Museum)

Murder Is Her Hobby: Frances Glessner Lee and The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death

 

October 20, 2017 – January 28, 2018

Renwick Gallery (Pennsylvania Avenue at 17th Street NW)
Interior detail of red bedroom study

Red Bedroom, Frances Glessner Lee, mixed media

This rare public display explores the unexpected intersection between craft and forensic science.

Murder Is Her Hobby: Frances Glessner Lee and The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death explores the surprising intersection between craft and forensic science. It also tells the story of how a woman co-opted traditionally feminine crafts to advance the male-dominated field of police investigation and to establish herself as one of its leading voices.

Frances Glessner Lee (1878-1962) crafted her extraordinary “Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death”—exquisitely detailed miniature crime scenes—to train homicide investigators to “convict the guilty, clear the innocent, and find the truth in a nutshell.” These dollhouse-sized dioramas of true crimes, created in the first half of the 20th century and still used in forensic training today, helped to revolutionize the emerging field of homicide investigation.

Lee, the first female police captain in the U.S., is considered the “mother of forensic science” and helped to found the first-of-its kind Department of Legal Medicine at Harvard University when the field of forensics was in its infancy. At the time, there was very little training for investigators, meaning that they often overlooked or mishandled key evidence, or irrevocably tampered with crime scenes. Few had any medical training that would allow them to determine cause of death. As Lee and her colleagues at Harvard worked to change this, tools were needed to help trainees scientifically approach their search for truth. Lee was a talented artist as well as criminologist, and used the craft of miniature-making that she had learned as a young girl to solve this problem. She constructed the Nutshells beginning in the 1940s to teach investigators to properly canvass a crime scene to effectively uncover and understand evidence. The equivalent to “virtual reality” in their time, her masterfully crafted dioramas feature handmade objects to render scenes with exacting accuracy and meticulous detail.

Every element of the dioramas—from the angle of miniscule bullet holes, the placement of latches on widows, the patterns of blood splatters, and the discoloration of painstakingly painted miniature corpses—challenges trainees’ powers of observation and deduction. The Nutshells are so effective that they are still used in training seminars today at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore.

A photograph of a nutshell study of unexplained death showing a detail of a burned cabin.

Frances Glessner Lee, Burned Cabin (detail), about 1944-48. Collection of the Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, courtesy of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Baltimore, MD

Showcasing the Nutshells at the Renwick allows visitors to appreciate them as works of art and material culture in addition to understanding their importance as forensic tools, and to see Lee’s genius for telling complex stories through the expressive potential of simple materials. While the Nutshells represent composites of real and extremely challenging cases featuring homicides, suicides, and accidental deaths, Lee imagined and designed each setting herself. She was both exacting and highly creative in her pursuit of detail—knitting tiny stocking by hand with straight pins, hand-rolling tiny tobacco-filled cigarettes and burning the ends, writing tiny letters with a single-hair paintbrush, and creating working locks for windows and doors.

The exhibition also highlights the subtly subversive quality of Lee’s work, especially the way her dioramas challenge the association of femininity with domestic bliss and upend the expected uses for miniature making, sewing, an other crafts considered to be “women’s work.” Also evident is her purposeful focus on society’s “invisible victims,” whose cases she championed. Lee was devoted to the search for truth and justice for everyone, and she often featured victims such as women, the poor, and and people living on the fringes of society, whose cases might be overlooked or tainted with prejudice on the part of the investigator. She wanted trainees to recognize and overcome any unconscious biases and to treat each case with rigor, regardless of the victim.

As the Nutshells are still active training tools, the solutions to each remain secret. However, the crime scene “reports” (written by Lee to accompany each case) given to forensic trainees are presented alongside each diorama to encourage visitors to approach the Nutshells the way an investigator would.

Murder Is Her Hobby: Frances Glessner Lee and The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death is the first public display of the complete series of nineteen studies still known to exist. For the first time since 1966, 18 pieces on loan to the museum from the Harvard Medical School via the Maryland Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, will be reunited with the “lost nutshell,” on loan from the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, courtesy of the Bethlehem Heritage Society. The exhibition is organized by Nora Atkinson, The Lloyd Herman Curator of Craft.

Lee’s hyperreal constructions inspired contemporary artist and scenic designer Rick Araluce, whose immersive, large-scale installation is presented in the adjoining gallery. Rick Aracluce: The Final Stop opens concurrently with Murder Is Her Hobby: Frances Glessner Lee and The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death on October 20th.

“The Nutshells are essentially about teaching people how to see. … So much of our culture has gone digital, and that’s where craft shines, because it’s three-dimensional. You can’t really understand it from the Internet, or from a flat page; you have to investigate it fully in the round.” – Nora Atkinson

Click HERE for more info on Murder is Her Hobby : Frances Glessner Lee and The Nutshell Diaries of Unexplained Death at the Renwick Gallery

MAYA FREELON ASANTE interviewed by Magic & Musings

17 Oct

M & M

Interview: Maya Freelon Asante on Being an Artist, Family Inspirations, and Working Outdoors

12:00 pm

Past Tense Present, 2015, 8.5”x18″, tissue ink mono/photo print
*All images are courtesy of Morton Fine Art.*

Today’s interview is with the incredibly talented creator Maya Freelon Asante, who creates bright, colourful, and complex artworks, sometimes combining printwork with photography. She dedicates her artwork to her grandmother, which you’ll find out a little more about in our interview, and comes from a family with its roots in the African American Impressionist movement. I love the colourful nature of her art, my favourites being ‘Dark Matter’ and ‘Divided/Whole’. Please read on to find out more about her story. Thank you for Morton Fine Art for providing images of her spectacular work to share with you today!

Magic & Musings:
For any readers who don’t know your background, do you want to tell me a bit about yourself and where you are today?

Maya Freelon Asante:
I’m an artist, a creator, a risk taker, and entrepreneur. I’m a Black woman; I always reiterate those two facts because I’m proud of them.
Magic & Musings:
If you describe your art style in three words, what would they be?
Maya Freelon Asante:
Bright, brilliant, kinetic.
Magic & Musings:
When did you first get into art? What first drew you to the field? Did you study it formally or come across it as a hobby?
Maya Freelon Asante:
I’ve always loved art since I was a little kid. It’s something that brought me peace and I could sit and draw for hours starting at about age five.
In middle school I had a teacher who saw my talent and really encouraged me by offering assignments that were challenging. I attended North Carolina Governor’s School and started painting, drawing, and sculpture in high school. I also discovered the artistic roots of own my family in high school. My great grandfather was a African American Impressionist painter named Allan Freelon and he worked during the Harlem Renaissance. I also apprenticed with a Black female artist, Beverly McIver.

Beasts of the Southern Wild, 2013, 62″x30, tissue ink monoprint & collage
Magic & Musings:
Did you have to find yourself overcoming any hurdles regarding your confidence when you first started displaying your art?
Maya Freelon Asante:
When I first started exhibiting my art I applied to lots of different exhibitions and got lots of rejections. I also got a few acceptances, which always led to other projects. I went straight from undergrad at Lafayette College to graduate school at Tufts School of the Museum of Fine Arts. I had a fast paced, accelerated journey through schooling so by the time I finished and I went straight into teaching at the college level. It was like I never left school. After two years I decided I wanted to try to make art full-time. I found art residencies, art grants, and living in a city that supports the arts are crucial to surviving as an artist. The three places I’ve lived in the last decade are Durham, North Carolina which has a great State Arts Council, Baltimore, Maryland which has MICA, and public art funds, and Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts offer really great opportunities for the emerging artist. I met Deborah Willis at Harvard, through the CCA conference. All of these opportunities helped build my artistic career.
Magic & Musings:
Of all of your work, what are you proudest of and why?
Maya Freelon Asante:
All of my artwork is dedicated to my grandmother, Queen Mother Frances J. Pierce and it’s either about living with her, remembering her as a child, using the tissue paper which I found tucked away in her basement, water damaged. She really had a huge impact in my creative life. And I’m proud of her life and legacy. Her sacrifices allowed me to be the artist I am today.

Handmade, 2013, 36″x37″, tissue ink monoprint
Magic & Musings:
This is a question I like to ask purely because of the variety of answers I get! I’m really interested in how people work and get things done. Do you have a particular place you work or find yourself most productive? Are there a particular set of things that need to be in place for things to get done, like a milky cup of tea or particular album of music you listen to?
Maya Freelon Asante:
I typically like to work outdoors, or in a place that can accept a lot of water because my creative process can get really wet. I also like to work in studio spaces that are outside of the home, but I recently moved into a place where my studio is in my home and I need a space that’s away from my living areas. I like to listen to Spotify and the station that I’m really feeling is Janelle Monae, Phony People and No Name and The Internet.
Magic & Musings:
What do you do if you find yourself stuck in a rut creatively?
Maya Freelon Asante:
Space to think and being quiet are super important when your are a creative person. That’s when I get my inspiration. If I’m stuck in a rut sometimes I write my journal or I’ll sit and meditate and be quiet and just let the creative process come through.

Inception, 2012, 90″x36″, tissue ink monoprint
Magic & Musings:
What are some things you like to do in your spare time when you aren’t working?
Maya Freelon Asante:
I love being outdoors, I love the water I like going on a nature walks and going to the ocean and going to the lake. I also love yoga and to go horseback riding.
Magic & Musings:
Have you ever explored working in another medium?
Maya Freelon Asante:
I started out doing drawing, painting, sculpture, and photography, and now merge all my media together. The two things that I’m still interested in learning are glassblowing and metal work.

Lost, 2015, 26.75”x17″, tissue ink monoprint
Magic & Musings:
What would you say your relationship is like between your business and the internet/social media? Would you say this has helped you greatly in your success, or not?
Maya Freelon Asante:
When I came up in college and graduate school, Facebook was just starting. So social media hadn’t popped off yet. I just started Instagram this year and it’s been interesting the amount of followers I’ve gotten in such a short amount of time.
Divided/Whole, 2015, 25.5”x19”, spinning tissue ink monoprint
Magic & Musings:
If there was one thing you could want to say to the world if you knew everyone was listening, what would it be and why?
Maya Freelon Asante:
The one thing I want to say to the world is there needs to be more love and peace for everybody. Be honest, forgive, and accept everybody for just where they are. I think we would have a much sweeter and loving place for everyone if we could do those things. Also we need to share our resources. There’s an abundance and just a few people are utilizing them. If we shared equally it would be a lot better for everybody.

Dark Matter,  2015, 55”x44”, spinning tissue ink monoprint
Magic & Musings:
What tools do you use to keep yourself organized?
Maya Freelon Asante:
Some may say I’m not organized at all, but I say there’s a method to my madness. What method you say? I’m not sure, I have to find it.
Magic & Musings:
What one thing do you wish someone told you when you were first starting out working in the field?
Maya Freelon Asante:
I wish somebody told me that I could do whatever I want if I just focus on my energy on it. That it’s going to take a lot of hard work and a lot of self-confidence. I started out teaching thinking that I needed to teach in order to be an artist and that’s not necessarily true. If you take your business skills, you take your creative skills, and then you take your entrepreneurial skills, and if you can merge all those three together you will have ability to be great at whatever you do.

Letter to my Great­ Great ­Grandmother, 2015, 8″x21″, tissue ink mono/photo print
Magic & Musings:
Onto a fun question! Can you recommend everyone read a book you have enjoyed recently, as well as a film and an album or song?
Maya Freelon Asante:
The books you should read are The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran and Love, Freedom and Aloneness by Osho. Those are totally personal books that have nothing to do with art. The art books you should read are anything by Deborah Willis, Ways of Seeing by John Berger, and A Natural History of the Senses. A film I would recommend is Beasts of the Southern Wild. An album I would recommend is Lauryn Hill’s Unplugged – I know that album is old, but every single time I listen to it I feel totally renewed in my life purpose.
Magic & Musings:
Is there anything else you would like to say before we finish? How can people find out more about you and your work?
Maya Freelon Asante:
I would say to all Black female artists who are wondering – should they do it? Could they do it? Just go for it! You don’t have to be the best artist, you don’t have to be the most well-known, you just have to speak with the voice that God gave you and let it come out in whatever form. Come share your gifts with the world because we are waiting!

See You Soon, 2015, 42″x30″, spinning tissue ink mono photo print

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON featured in Brick City Live

17 Oct

 

Dr. Ntozake Shange’s seminal work gets a gallery’s worth of consideration in new exhibit

Published October 14, 2017 | Andaiye Taylor


Amber Robles-Gordon, “My Rainbow is Enuf”, Fabric on chicken wire, 2014

Dr. Ntzoke Shange’s choreopoem for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf has bent genres, broken ground, won awards, and inspired legions of people who have seen or read the landmark work, which debuted on Broadway in 1976.

The play touches on themes of sexuality, race, sisterhood, violence and self-love, and in its universality has been taken up and reimagined by people bearing a cross-section of racial and gender identities.

This year at Open Doors, curator Peter “Souleo” Wright will bring a traveling exhibit commemorating for colored girls to City Without Walls (cWOW) gallery, which is located in Newark’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. i found god in myself: a celebration of Dr. Ntozake Shange’s, for colored girls opens Saturday, October 14th and runs through November 18th. (RSVP for the opening.)

The exhibit consists of 10 commissioned artworks, each of which illustrates, comments on or is inspired by one of the poems that constitute for colored girls. The artists whose work will be featured in the exhibit are Amber Robles-Gordon, Beau McCall, Dianne Smith, Kathleen Granados, Kimberly Mayhorn, Margaret Rose Vendryes, Melissa Calderón, Michael Paul Britto, Pamela Council and Uday K. Dhar. Dr. Shange will appear in person at the October 14th opening. (She will also be a panelist at A Conversation With…, another Open Doors event, at Gateway Project Spaces on Sunday, October 15th.)

Dr. Ntozake Shange will attend the October 14th opening reception for i found god in myself.

“This exhibition underscores the conversation Dr. Shange started, extending the legacy and impact of her work into the visual arts medium,” explained Souleo, according to a statement about the exhibit, which debuted in 2014 at the Schomburg Center and La Maison d’art in New York, and has since traveled to Philadelphia and Houston.

i found god in myself will also include material from the Barnard Archives that highlights the creation and evolution of the original text, from its 1974 debut in Berkeley, California at a bar named Bacchanal to its Broadway run, for which featured actress Trazana Beverley won a Tony Award. Dr. Shange and cast also won an Obie Award for the Off-Broadway incarnation of the play.

“It is not only gratifying, but joyous to share for colored girls with the Newark community,” Dr. Shange said.

While Dr. Shange’s work focuses on black women, the artists Souleo called on to contribute to the exhibit are women and men across cultures and generations–a nod to the work’s transcendent impact, and also “to demonstrate that the banner of feminism can and must be carried and waved by every ally who shares its tenets of social justice,” according to a curatorial statement about the exhibit.

That statement explained further that the exhibit is meant to “respect the origins of Dr. Shange’s work while bringing it forward into today’s expanded conversation on human rights.”

cWOW is the state’s oldest alternative art space. Executive director fayemi shakur said it is an “honor to share Dr. Shange’s work” at the gallery.

 

Click HERE to read the article in full.

 

Click HERE to view available artwork by AMBER ROBLES-GORDON.

MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON’s exhibition at Pratt Institute in NYC

13 Oct
MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON, Peach Tree and Pine, 18″x24″, watercolor on paper

 

Tuesday, Sep 12, 2017 -Friday, Oct 06, 2017
Location
School of Continuing and Professional Studies Gallery, Pratt Manhattan Center, 2nd floor, 144 West 14th Street, New York, NY
Restoration. A solo exhibition of work by Pratt alumnus, Mario Andres Robinson
You are cordially invited to view an exhibition of recent work by Mario Andres Robinson at the School of Continuing and Professional Studies Gallery, Pratt Manhattan Center, New York City.
The exhibition showcases recent work never exhibited in New York before, bringing together portraits, and landscapes focused on architecture.
Robinson’s work fits squarely within the tradition of American painting. His finished works bear a close affinity to the masters of the realist tradition, Andrew Wyeth and Thomas Eakins.
Containing few references to modern life, Robinson’s work has a timeless and universal quality, and exhibits a distinct turn-of-the-century stylistic aesthetic. The images he chooses, which refer to a bygone era where solitude and reflection were abundant, also provoke frequent allusions to the paintings of Winslow Homer and Edward Hopper.
Join Mario Andres Robinson’s course with SCPS this fall:
Painting the Figure in Watercolor
XFA-458

MARIO ANDRES ROBINSON, Transition, 22″x16″, watercolor on paper

 

KATHERINE TZU-LAN MANN featured in House Beautiful Magazine

12 Oct

Living Room
“Lush and not prissy,” says Gridley about the living room’s facing sofas, which are covered in an Old World Weavers blue linen velvet. The vintage coffee table is by Tomasso Barbi. An artwork by Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann hangs over an Outpost Original hide bench that “is pulled into action,” Gridley says, for extra seating during parties. – Maura McEvoy