Tag Archives: amy morton

NATHANIEL DONNETT’s solo exhibition opens Oct 23rd at the Mattatuck Museum

17 Oct

Mattatuck Donnett Exhibition Invite Front web

Mattatuck Donnett Exhibition Invite Back web

Alone in My Four Cornered Room – A Solo Exhibition of Artwork by NATHANIEL DONNETT

October 23, 2014- January 4, 2015

Mattatuck Museum, 144 West Main Street, Waterbury, CT

mattatuckmuseum.org

 

Context & Reflection: The Art of Nathaniel Donnett

In this exhibition, Alone in My Four Cornered Room, Nathaniel Donnett navigates the crossroads between the self and perception by others. His drawings, paintings, and sculpture suggest the transitional and unstable nature of perception. Donnett’s work is richly conceptualized and steeped in a deeply reflective, witty, and theoretically grounded history of race and difference in the United States. His work references the landmark scholarship of historian and activist, W.E.B. Dubois, and attends closely to the concept of double consciousness – DuBois’ understanding of the complex and nuanced ways in which African Americans in the United States must negotiate and reconcile their identity as both American and Black – both part of and pushed away from the heart of national identity. Donnett, like DuBois, is wrestling with the “peculiar sensation” in which one has “this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity.”

The title of the show, “Alone in My Four Cornered Room,” references a lyric from the 1991 classic hip-hop song, “My Mind’s Playing Tricks on Me,” by trio The Geto Boys. The song, like Donnett’s works explore isolation, paranoia, and identity in which perception of self and self-knowledge do not always match. In this way, Donnett takes up a strategy that has fortified hip-hop: referencing back to others in order to assemble links and connections. Both The Geto Boy and Donnett are exploring self-doubt, safety, and psychological well-being in the face of “double consciousness.” The works in this show represent Donnett’s investments in examining the entangled relationships between society, the art world, and identity. By exploring experiences of isolation, loneliness, and social stigma, and self -determination, Donnett restores and reclaims the humanity of African Americans living complex emotional lives.

Donnett’s layered works defy singular description, rather they are purposefully resistant to either/or interpretations or linear narratives. Donnett’s work is presenting us with both/and narratives in which as viewer we have a small window in which to glimpse the vertinginous experience of being both erased and highly visible – to be forced to know oneself based on the fears others might have of you. Donnett refers to this entangled interaction between the self and society as projections, noting that many of the notions we have about each other are based on narrow narratives or misinformation. Donnett’s work suggests that none of us are safe from internalizing misperceptions of others – even the misperceptions of our own identities and selves – and he explores how very challenging, complicated, and tangled such experiences can be. His carefully crafted work plays with the distance between self-knowledge and self-perception, while investigating the spaces where art, music, identity, history, the Black imagination, culture, the self, and standards of beauty may be explored – and even challenged. Donnett’s use of such diverse materials gestures toward the improvisation he highlights as part of African American culture.

 

Opening Reception Shots from “Timeless Remnants”

9 Oct

Thanks to photographer and MFA guest Ruby Hardy Black for documenting our opening reception for the group exhibition, “Timeless Remnants” featuring artwork by MAYA FREELON ASANTE, GA GARDNER & CHOICHUN LEUNG.

Thank you to all our collectors and art enthusiasts who came out for this wonderful exhibition!

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A sneak peek preview of JASON SHO GREEN’s robotic installation!

20 Feb

Don’t miss the OPENING RECEPTION of “Reveries” this Friday, February 21st from 6-8pm!

The exhibit will feature robotic installations & drawings by JASON SHO GREEN and ceramic installations & wall mounted sculptures by VICTORIA SHAHEEN

February 21st, 2014 – March 18th, 2014

THE GUARDIANS, a solo exhibition of new work by artist KESHA BRUCE. December 14th, 2013-January 8th, 2014.

19 Dec

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About the Guardians:

In the winter of 2011, Kesha Bruce awoke in the early morning hours to see a figure hovering silently at the foot of her bed. This brief moment of fascination, terror, and eventually wonder, has beenthe obsessive focus of her work for nearly three years. To date, Bruce has completed nearly 200 works based on The Guardians – a group of solemn, mysterious figures who act as watchers, keepers, and protectors.
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About Kesha Bruce:
Sidestepping the weight and implications of formalized religion forthe better part of her career, Bruce’s work has explored the fertile territory of memory, mythology, African-American folklore, and magical-spiritual belief. With The Guardians her work makes a shift towards questioning not only the place of spiritual practice in contemporary culture, but also the place of genuine spiritual experience in contemporary art making.

THE GUARDIANS Opening Reception and Artist Talk

18 Dec

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About the Guardians:

In the winter of 2011, Kesha Bruce awoke in the early morning hours to see a figure hovering silently at the foot of her bed. This brief moment of fascination, terror, and eventually wonder, has beenthe obsessive focus of her work for nearly three years. To date, Bruce has completed nearly 200 works based on The Guardians – a group of solemn, mysterious figures who act as watchers, keepers, and protectors.
Sidestepping the weight and implications of formalized religion forthe better part of her career, Bruce’s work has explored the fertile territory of memory, mythology, African-American folklore, and magical-spiritual belief. With The Guardians her work makes a shift towards questioning not only the place of spiritual practice in contemporary culture, but also the place of genuine spiritual experience in contemporary art making.
The show will run through January 8th, 2014

MFA’s Artist Meet & Greets at Aqua Art Miami

15 Nov
Join MORTON FINE ART at Aqua Art Miami December 4-8, 2013
Artist “meet and greets” scheduled in our Booth 216 at 3pm 

 
MAYA FREELON ASANTE – Thursday, 12/5 at 3pm 
Maya Freelon Asante with her tissue ink monoprint and Ubuntu tissue quilt sculpture, photo credit: Greg Powers

Maya Freelon Asante with her tissue ink monoprint and Ubuntu tissue quilt sculpture, photo credit: Greg Powers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEPHON SENEGAL – Friday, 12/6 at 3pm

Stephon Senegal sculpting in bronze, photo credit: Stephon Senegal

Stephon Senegal sculpting in bronze, photo credit: Stephon Senegal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KESHA BRUCE – Saturday, 12/7 at 3pm

Kesha Bruce in front of her series "The Guardians" unveiling at Aqua and her solo at Morton Fine Art opening Saturday, December 14th, 2014, photo credit: Kesha Bruce

Kesha Bruce in front of her series “The Guardians” unveiling at Aqua and her solo at Morton Fine Art opening Saturday, December 14th, 2014, photo credit: Kesha Bruce

MAYA FREELON ASANTE in Luxe Magazine

30 Oct

Enjoy this wonderful feature on MAYA FREELON ASANTE in the Fall 2013 addition of Luxe Magazine!

 

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Morton Fine Art – Booth Shots of ArtHamptons 2013

19 Jul
Sophia Guerci and Amy Morton at ArtHamptons 2013

Sophia Guerci and Amy Morton at ArtHamptons 2013

The oil paintings of JULIA FERNANDEZ POL

The oil paintings of JULIA FERNANDEZ POL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morton Fine Art at ArtHamptons 2012, Booth shot of MAYA FREELON ASANTE and JULIA FERNANDEZ POL

Morton Fine Art at ArtHamptons 2012, Booth shot of MAYA FREELON ASANTE and JULIA FERNANDEZ POL

Amy Morton and STEPHON SENEGAL at ArtHamptons. Stephon Senegal "019", 52"x13"x13", bronze sculpture

Amy Morton and STEPHON SENEGAL at ArtHamptons.
Stephon Senegal “019”, 52″x13″x13″, bronze sculpture

Artwork by Nigerian born VICTOR EKPUK

Artwork by Nigerian born VICTOR EKPUK

NATHANIEL DONNETT's conceptual narratives on paper bags

NATHANIEL DONNETT’s conceptual narratives on paper bags

Morton Fine Art at Art Hamptons 2013, Booth 411

5 Jul

Inline image 3

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Thursday, July 11 2013 | 6:30-9:30pm | VIP Opening Preview Party

Regular Fair Hours:
Friday, July 12         | 11am – 8pm
Saturday, July 13    | 11am – 8pm
Sunday, July 14      | 11am – 6pm

Location

The Sculpture Fields of Nova’s Ark

60 Milestone Road (off roundabout on Scuttle Hole Road)

Bridgehampton, NY

Morton Fine Art will be located in Booth 411.

Artists Represented

Maya Freelon Asante

Nathaniel Donnett

Victor Ekpuk

Julia Fernandez Pol

Stephon Senegal

About Morton Fine Art (MFA)

Founded in 2010 in Washington, DC, Morton Fine Art (MFA) represents a diverse roster of emerging to mid career national and international contemporary artists.  MFA’s primary focus, although not exclusive, is abstract and figurative work. Featured mediums include a rich variety of artworks on paper and canvas as well as sculpture. Dedicated to the belief that anyone can become an art collector, Morton Fine Art (MFA) is an accessible and education-oriented fine art gallery devoted to inspiring fresh ways of acquiring contemporary art.

HAMPTONSINVITE

MAYA FREELON ASANTE in the International Review of African American Art

11 Jun

Scattered to the Wind

Maya Freelon-Asante Ventures into Performance Art

by Schwanda Rountree

Maya Freelon Asante collaborated with the bay breeze sweeping through the busy, commercial district of Baltimore as she presented a debut piece called Scattered to the Wind.   The kinetic art performance at the Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower rained, colorful free-falling art down on all below.

View of Maya Freelon Asante's Scattered to the Wind performance. Photo credit: Chris Metzger.

View of Maya Freelon Asante’s Scattered to the Wind performance. Photo credit: Chris Metzger.

Those who had come to participate in the performance were led by the artist through an interactive experience highlighting both the fragility and strength of art.  She urged them to surrender to the act of letting go and to the beauty of now — the now of that sunny, April 27, 2014 afternoon.

Poet Maya Angelou’s description of her namesake Maya Freelon Asante as “visualizing the truth about the vulnerability and power of the human being” was on vivid display that day.

View of Maya Freelon Asante's Scattered to the wind performance. Photo credit: Chris Metzger.

View of Maya Freelon Asante’s Scattered to the wind performance. Photo credit: Chris Metzger.

What made the Scattered to the Wind additionally captivating to the participants who have followed her career was that it was her first performance. “I had to call my extraordinarily talented art buddy Holly Bass, just to make sure what I envisioned was technically an ‘art performance,’” Freelon Asante says.   Artist Holly Bass’ endurance, seven-hour performance last year at the Corcoran merged legacies of the Hottentot Venus, the godfather of soul and much more.

Freelon Asante has previously  collaborated with choreographers “but this was very different,” she says.  “I know tissue paper lends itself to movement and I’ve played with that in the gallery and theater setting, but being outside and orchestrating the whole process was different.  I’d say it was a collaboration between myself and the Baltimore city that day, which was amazing!

“I wanted to push the boundaries of how and where we view art. Challenging what fuels our desire to preserve or protect something. My vision was beautiful art raining down on Baltimore city’s knowing spectators, Lexington Market cruisers, liquor store locals, lost tourists and orioles fans. The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower − I’ve had a studio there for the last 3 years − is at the intersection of so many different types of folk. I wanted them all to witness and experience this letting go as a gift.  Free falling art for all.

“And each tissue piece I dropped was special a momento of my history and process, it could have been from my grandmother’s basement, during a residency at Skowhegan, from my installation in Madagascar… I was in a sense giving away a piece of myself. I even handed out special tissue bits to people who didn’t catch one. That part reminded me of communion, which I guess it was!”

Freelon Asante’s current major project, the Clothesline Muse, incorporates  dance, live music, spoken word, interview text, video and interactive art.  The cast will include six dancers, a percussionist, and Freelon Asante’s mother, Nnenna Freelon, the well-known jazz singer as “The Muse.”   Her daughter’s colorful tissue paper art will hang on the clothesline like laundry drying in the sun.  These sun-and-wind dried, tissue-paper “clothes” will be a vibrant resonance of the Scattered to the Wind performance in Baltimore.

Let go with me
Make room for joy!
The weightlessness
of forgiveness
Seeks peace
With love

—poem by Maya Freelon Asante

See the Scattered to the Wind performance here: https://vimeo.com/66331082

Schwanda Rountree is an attorney, art collector and principal of Rountree Art Consulting.