Tag Archives: Amber Robles Gordon

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON reviewed by Renee Royale for #supportblackart

20 May
A huge and enthusiastic Thank You to #supportblackart and writer Renee Royale for her thoughtful and valued review: AMBER ROBLES-GORDON: THE FINE ART OF INTROSPECTION AND EXTROSPECTION
 

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON: THE FINE ART OF INTROSPECTION AND EXTROSPECTION

Exhibited at not one but two DC galleries, Amber Robles-Gordon is a captivating artist whose intricate, analytical work lends thought to how we as humans perceive our world, and our place in it.

Her works at her solo show at Morton Fine Art gallery, “Third Eye Open”, on display until May 20th, are an insightful introspective to an “internal conversation about the interconnectedness of human life”, and involves sacred geometry, self exploration, transit timing variation, and the expanse of the universe.

Amber Robles-Gordon, Third Eye Open. 2018

Ink drawing and Collage.

Her work is multilayered; upon first glance there is an overall image presented of cellular circles that contain significant amounts of patterned dark matter, or space, and then heavily layered nuclei that are brightly colored with strategically placed materials giving balance to the form. Then, upon closer inspection, one discovers tiny details, be they altering textures or hand drawn ink strokes, all seamlessly weaving their individualities into the cohesiveness of the piece. Her art is steeped in duality and the connection to divine feminine, an examination of what femininity means and how it is viewed in relationship to the masculine. Her spirals are comprised of bits of lace, portion of a blouse, lanyard reminiscent of childhood art endeavors, and other found materials that represent the realm of womanhood. The pieces spiral, reminiscent of kundalini energy, further enhanced by the subtle abstract snakes that are strategically woven into the tapestries.

Amber Robles Gordon, Kepler 19-c, 2018
36×36 in., mixed media on canvas
Courtesy of the artist

It is representational of the connectivity of all things: how we all come from dark, feminine energy, our lives a long spiral of events as we complete rotations up our axis and revolve around each other. Some pieces are complements by smaller rotational pieces, mimicking a planet that has many moons. One piece in particular, Kepler 19-c, alluding to the extra solar planet that was discovered due to the variation of transition of a previous exo-planet, Kepler 19-b. Disrupted data led scientists to discover the planet Kepler 19-c, whose gravitational pull had just enough force on the other planet to cause the variation and thus revealing itself. Galaxies and new planets are being formed every day, in this cyclical thing called life that we are just tiny specks in. As the saying goes, one drop has many ripples, and Robles-Gordon’s work exemplifies this.

Amber Robles-Gordon, Kepler 19-b Super Earth, 2018
36 x 36 in., mixed media on canvas
Courtesy of the artist

One thing that was also noted at Morton Fine Art was the connectivity and understanding held by the founder and chief curator, Amy Morton. Her respect and understanding of the work, and the care she undertakes to accurately represent her artists, is something of note and puts MFA on a tier above many galleries existing today. It is highly suggested to stay connected to MFA via their website and mailing list. They represent an exemplary roster of artists, especially artists of color, that are on the rise and are creating phenomenal art.

 The artist and her work, Morton Fine Art Gallery. 2018

The artist and her work, Morton Fine Art Gallery. 2018

Robles-Gordon is also in a group show at Hemphill Fine Arts, titled “More or Less” that runs through June 9th. Her piece in that show, “International Realms”, explores her experiences as an Afrolatina navigating a patriarchal society. A paper collage on canvas, which is rectangular as opposed to her solo show’s circular works, from afar looks like a linear, abstract layering of a sunset and land. Up close, each layer has their own elements and color schemes that interact and coexist with each other. Filled with celestial bodies, textures of nature, flora, fauna, and of course, humans, the canvas contains reflective dualities hidden in the works that are only noticed upon intricate inspection. This creates an interesting balance that is interjected by long white bamboo-like stalks that span across the piece, giving the impression of one peeking into another world.

 Amber Robles-Gordon, Interdimensional Realms   Paper Collage on Canvas, 2017 

Amber Robles-Gordon, Interdimensional Realms

Paper Collage on Canvas, 2017

Amber Robles-Gordon is a DC native who is not just an artist but also an arts advocate and educator, creating and also giving back to her city. Check out more of her work at her website, amberroblesgordon.com.

Morton Fine Art is located at 1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts), Washington, DC 20009. “Third Eye Open” has been extended until May 20th. Hours are Tues-Sat: 11am – 6pm; Sun: 12pm – 5pm; Mon: by appointment.

Hemphill Fine Arts is located at 1515 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20005. “More or Less” runs through June 9th. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10am-5pm, or by appointment.

 

CLICK HERE TO VIEW AVAILABLE ARTWORK BY AMBER ROBLES-GORDON.
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NATE LEWIS featured in Lancaster Online

2 Nov

November 2, 2017
Mosaic Project artist Nate Lewis uses his experience as a nurse in his art

man

Most artists know from the time they are little kids that they will become artists.

Nate Lewis, one of this year’s mosaic artists at Pennsylvania College of Art & Design, knew from the time he was a child that he wanted to be a nurse, like his dad.

He had no idea that his nursing career would become the foundation of his art career.

I was planning to be a nurse since sixth grade,” says Lewis, who grew up in Beaver Falls in western Pennsylvania. “I got good grades, and I played lots of basketball. I didn’t grow up making art at all.”

Lewis will talk about his nontraditional journey as an artist Friday at 2 p.m. And from 6 to 7 p.m., the public can meet Lewis during a First Friday event.

And his exhibit will be on display through Dec. 8, along with one by fellow mosaic artist Amber Robles Gordon.

Music was the first foray into art for Lewis.

“Coming out of college and into my mid-20s was a time where I listened to everything,” he says. “The music spoke to me so much in so many different ways.”

He started playing violin, taking about 8 or 9 lessons and then teaching himself.

“I played two or three hours a day,” Lewis says. “The way I am, when I really like something, I dive in.”

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Selfie

He moved to Virginia and started working in the intensive care unit of a hospital. Required to take some classes, he started doodling when class got too dull.

This wasn’t actually a breakthrough for him. It was just doodling.

But then his sister, who is a visual artist, saw something in those doodles and for Christmas 2010, she bought him some art supplies and a book about drawing.

“My sister told me to draw what was in front of me, but I found it boring. I knew that I wanted to draw organs and instruments, red blood cells, images from an electronic microscope. That was my world.”

He drew lungs coming out of a trumpet, red blood cells coming out of a pipe.

“I loved it. This is exactly what I wanted to draw.”

His sister loved the images, too, and suggested they make T-shirts.

While he spent his spare time working on the T-shirts, he missed drawing his unique images. So he quit the T-shirt business and began working on his drawings. Two cross-sections of brains that looked like headphones. A bagpipe sitting on top of a stomach.

He was still working in the hospital, where he moved from neuroscience-surgical intensive care to medical-surgical intensive care and to a stroke unit, where he was involved in rehab.

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nate lewis

And his work evolved from the basics of anatomy to a deeper, more intense kind of work.

He began exploring and working with layers of paper, specifically paper from MRIs and CAT scans.

“I was thinking of the rhythms and records of people’s lives. I thought about vulnerability, empathy and care. You’ve got such an intimate relationship with patients and family members. I don’t think I will have a more intimate relationship. These are vulnerable and tragic times for people.”

As art took over his life, Lewis stopped working as a nurse and now devotes himself to exploring new ideas and expanding on older ideas.

“I wanted to add life to my work, not just the hospital,” Lewis says, noting that he has been influenced by his brother-in-law, who is also a visual artist.

Lewis is now thinking about history and African-American figures and narratives.

“I’ve started using African-American figures and thinking about empathy and what is empathy outside of the hospital. Empathy is not a passive thing. It is very active. So I am educating myself on unknown histories, with things I have been unaware of.

“I’m adding life to movement and then I am thinking about textures in bodies. Tensions past, present and future.”

He will keep evolving.

“As time goes on, I try to understand more and more by using empathy, understanding and caring,” Lewis says. “My work was physically taking care of people, and I see everybody with this lens.”¶

 

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON featured in Brick City Live

17 Oct

 

Dr. Ntozake Shange’s seminal work gets a gallery’s worth of consideration in new exhibit

Published October 14, 2017 | Andaiye Taylor


Amber Robles-Gordon, “My Rainbow is Enuf”, Fabric on chicken wire, 2014

Dr. Ntzoke Shange’s choreopoem for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf has bent genres, broken ground, won awards, and inspired legions of people who have seen or read the landmark work, which debuted on Broadway in 1976.

The play touches on themes of sexuality, race, sisterhood, violence and self-love, and in its universality has been taken up and reimagined by people bearing a cross-section of racial and gender identities.

This year at Open Doors, curator Peter “Souleo” Wright will bring a traveling exhibit commemorating for colored girls to City Without Walls (cWOW) gallery, which is located in Newark’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. i found god in myself: a celebration of Dr. Ntozake Shange’s, for colored girls opens Saturday, October 14th and runs through November 18th. (RSVP for the opening.)

The exhibit consists of 10 commissioned artworks, each of which illustrates, comments on or is inspired by one of the poems that constitute for colored girls. The artists whose work will be featured in the exhibit are Amber Robles-Gordon, Beau McCall, Dianne Smith, Kathleen Granados, Kimberly Mayhorn, Margaret Rose Vendryes, Melissa Calderón, Michael Paul Britto, Pamela Council and Uday K. Dhar. Dr. Shange will appear in person at the October 14th opening. (She will also be a panelist at A Conversation With…, another Open Doors event, at Gateway Project Spaces on Sunday, October 15th.)

Dr. Ntozake Shange will attend the October 14th opening reception for i found god in myself.

“This exhibition underscores the conversation Dr. Shange started, extending the legacy and impact of her work into the visual arts medium,” explained Souleo, according to a statement about the exhibit, which debuted in 2014 at the Schomburg Center and La Maison d’art in New York, and has since traveled to Philadelphia and Houston.

i found god in myself will also include material from the Barnard Archives that highlights the creation and evolution of the original text, from its 1974 debut in Berkeley, California at a bar named Bacchanal to its Broadway run, for which featured actress Trazana Beverley won a Tony Award. Dr. Shange and cast also won an Obie Award for the Off-Broadway incarnation of the play.

“It is not only gratifying, but joyous to share for colored girls with the Newark community,” Dr. Shange said.

While Dr. Shange’s work focuses on black women, the artists Souleo called on to contribute to the exhibit are women and men across cultures and generations–a nod to the work’s transcendent impact, and also “to demonstrate that the banner of feminism can and must be carried and waved by every ally who shares its tenets of social justice,” according to a curatorial statement about the exhibit.

That statement explained further that the exhibit is meant to “respect the origins of Dr. Shange’s work while bringing it forward into today’s expanded conversation on human rights.”

cWOW is the state’s oldest alternative art space. Executive director fayemi shakur said it is an “honor to share Dr. Shange’s work” at the gallery.

 

Click HERE to read the article in full.

 

Click HERE to view available artwork by AMBER ROBLES-GORDON.

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON’s art + justice “Talking Sticks” workshop at Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture

7 Oct

Click HERE to sign up for this exciting “Talking Sticks” workshop with AMBER ROBLES-GORDON at the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC).

art + justice with Amber Robles-Gordon

art + justice with Amber Robles-Gordon

When Friday, October 20, 2017, 7:30 – 9:50pm
Details

art + justice is a platform for adults to explore the intersection of tactile art-making, thoughtful reflection, and personal enrichment. Through artist-led guided projects audiences unlock their creative potential within themselves, while also enjoying the opportunity to exchange ideas with community towards social justice. art + justice is a hands-on maker space that stimulates creative agency, while providing the mental and emotional space to work through complicated issues around race, gender, identity, and social cohesion.

Through art + justice the museum provides a rare creative outlet where audiences can interact with professional artists, experience expert techniques in a variety of art practices, and explore motivations for creating art. Art projects are designed to accommodate all skill levels. Audiences can take home their creations.

This program amplifies an important pillar of the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s  mission to explore and share how American values such as resilience, optimism, and agency are reflected in the African American community’s past, present, and future. art + justice embraces the therapeutic power of creativity to improve well-being, increase positive emotions and endorphins, and invigorate restorative energy towards personal and social peace and wellness.

Artist + Art Project:
Washington, DC textile and mixed media artist, Amber Robles-Gordon leads a beginner’s-level art lesson creating “Talking Sticks” – a symbol used in many indigenous cultures to designate the authority to speak within a group setting. This symbolic art-making lesson reflects on the long history of community activism with the African American community and beyond and encourages dialogue while providing space for personal reflection and introspection.


Light refreshments will be served, included in the ticket price of the event.

Event Location Heritage Hall, African American History and Culture
Webcast www.ustream.tv…
Get Tickets www.etix.com…
Accessibility Wheelchair accessible

MFA’s NATE LEWIS and AMBER ROBLES-GORDON at the Pennsylvania College of Art & Design

29 Sep

 

 

The Mosaic Project: Amber Robles Gordon and Nate Lewis

The 9th annual Mosaic Project:

Amber Robles Gordon and Nate Lewis

Made possible in part by a grant from the Richard S. & Ann B, Barshinger Family Foundation

Oct 2ndDec 8th

First Friday receptions October 6, Nov 3 and Dec 1

Amber Robles Gordon

Amber Robles-Gordon, is a mixed media visual artist.  She primarily works and is known for her use of found objects and textile to create assemblages, large-scale sculptures and installations.  Her work is representational of her experiences and the paradoxes within the female experience.

Nate Lewis

Nate Lewis is a self taught artist, drawing inspiration from anatomy, physiology, disease processes and his nursing experience as a care taker of patients and their family members he creates stunning, intricate 2-3d sculptures out of single sheets of paper that visually combines the aesthetics of drawing, sculpture, etching, embroidery, and textiles.

The Mosaic Project: The significance of art in the lives of our youth cannot be underestimated. Yet, just when research is finally emerging that supports this, budget cuts and curricular demands are threatening the foundation of creativity in our public schools. In order to fill that gap as well as enrich the community, Pennsylvania College of Art & Design developed The Mosaic Project, a multicultural exhibition and education program for students and families in Lancaster County.

 


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 pca&d

AMBER ROBLES GORDON and NATE LEWIS at Pennsylvania College of Art & Design

8 Jun

The Mosaic Project: Amber Robles Gordon and Nathaniel Lewis

The 9th annual Mosaic Project:

Amber Robles Gordon and Nathaniel Lewis

Oct 2ndDec 8th

First Friday receptions October 6, Nov 3 and Dec 1

Amber Robles Gordon

“My artwork is a visual representation of my hybridism: a fusion of my gender, ethnicity, cultural, and social experiences. I impose colors, imagery, and materials that evoke femininity and tranquility with the intent of transcending or balancing a specific form. I associate working with light, color, and energy as a positive means to focus on the healing power found in the creative process and within us all. It is my belief that colors have both feminine and masculine energies and each color represents a specific aspect of nature.”

Amber Robles-Gordon, is a mixed media visual artist.  She primarily works and is known for her use of found objects and textile to create assemblages, large-scale sculptures and installations.  Her work is representational of her experiences and the paradoxes within the female experience.

Robles-Gordon has over fifteen years of exhibiting, art education, and exhibition coordinating experience.  She completed her Masters of Fine Arts from Howard University in November 2011, where she has received annual awards and accolades for her artwork. Since, her exhibitions and artwork has been reviewed and/or featured in the Washington Post, Washington City Paper, Washington Informer, Examiner, WAMU American University Radio, WPFW 89.3, MSNBC the grio, Hyperallergeric, Ebony.com, the Miami Herald, Huffington Post, Bmore Art Magazine, and Callaloo Art & Culture in the African Diaspora.

She has exhibited nationally and in Germany, Italy, Malaysia, London, and Spain. In 2010, Robles-Gordon was granted apprenticeship to create a public art installation with the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, D.C. Creates Public Arts Program. Robles-Gordon was also commissioned to create temporary and permanent public art installations for numerous art fairs and agencies such as the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, DCCAH, Northern Virginia Fine Arts Association (NVFAA), Humanities Council of Washington, D.C., Howard University, The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the Washington Projects for the Arts.

Throughout her career, she serves as an advocate for the Washington, DC area arts community. As of November 2004 through July 2012, Robles-Gordon has been an active member of the Black Artists DC, (BADC) serving as exhibitions coordinator, Vice President and President. Robles-Gordon is also the Co-Founder of Delusions of Grandeur Artist Collective. In 2012, Robles-Gordon was selected to present for the Under the Influence competition as part of the 30 Americans Exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Additionally, she has been commissioned by the Smithsonian Anacostia Museum, Luther College, WETA Television, Al Jazeera, The Kojo Nnamdi Show, Howard University, David C. Driskell Center, the Phillips Collection, the African American Museum in Philadelphia  and Mc Daniel College  to teach workshops, give commentary, and or present about her artwork. Most recently, Robles-Gordon has been selected for the Centro Cultural Costarricense-Norteamericano, Back the Roots, Teaching Residency in Limon, Costa Rica.

 

Nate Lewis

“As a critical care registered nurse I desired to become emotionally porous. I sought for the impersonal experiences of patients and families to become personal and intimate. This resulted in distilling untested qualities of my character and further illuminating areas of my identity. I aim for this work to show the power of freedom within boundaries, and to question to what lengths are we willing to lay aside our pride, comfort, and fear to make room for empathy, within intimate and larger social contexts.”

Born and raised outside of Pittsburgh in the town of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, Nate Lewis is currently living and working in Washington, DC.

Lewis began his working career as a critical care registered nurse, he received a BS in nursing in 2008 and has since worked in a medical-surgical intensive care unit, a stroke unit, and spent most of his time in a neuroscience-surgical intensive care unit. He has been working as a critical care registered nurse for six years. He began pursuing the arts in 2008, first it was music, violin. He then started pursuing the visual arts in 2010. A self-taught artist, drawing inspiration from anatomy, physiology, disease processes and his nursing experience as a care taker of patients and their family members he creates stunning, intricate 2-3d sculptures out of  single sheets of paper that visually combines the aesthetics of drawing, sculpture, etching,  embroidery, and textiles. His approach to his work is often instinctive and free while at the same time surgically precise. Lewis’s work pushes the idea of freedom within boundaries, and seeks to confront perceptions of vulnerability, tragedy, and time.

He has exhibited his work more than 30 times in the past 5 years, most recently at the  Morton Fine Art, Washington DC, Loyola University, Baltimore, MD, 2016 Biological Tapestries 1st Movement, Morton Fine Art, Washington DC,  Art on the Vine, Marthas Vineyard, MA,  GalleryNine5, New York, NY, Joan Hisoka Gallery, Washington, DC, Cordesa Fine Art, San Francisco, Ca, and Brilliant Champions Gallery, Brooklyn NY. His work has been covered in the Houston Chronicle , Strictly Paper   and Scrub Magazine.  He has been a recipient three times of the DC Commission of the Arts & Humanities Visual Artist Fellowship Grant, Artist in Residence by Pioneer Works, Brooklyn, NY, and Regional Winner of Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series, Washington DC.

The Mosaic Project: The significance of art in the lives of our youth cannot be underestimated. Yet, just when research is finally emerging that supports this, budget cuts and curricular demands are threatening the foundation of creativity in our public schools. In order to fill that gap as well as enrich the community, Pennsylvania College of Art & Design developed The Mosaic Project, a multicultural exhibition and education program for students and families in Lancaster County.

 

– See more at: http://pcad.edu/gallery-exhibit/the-mosaic-project-amber-robles-gordon-and-nathaniel-lewis/#sthash.Yzma5SLf.dpuf

Click HERE to view available artwork by AMBER ROBLES GORDON and NATE LEWIS.

AMBER ROBLES GORDON at the Houston Museum of African-American Culture

22 Mar

THE HOUSTON MUSEUM OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN CULTURE PRESENTS  i found god in myself: a celebration of Dr. Ntozake Shange’s, for colored girls
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 THROUGH APRIL 15, 2017  Houston, TX- February 7, 2017— In honor of Women’s History Month, The Houston Museum of African-American Culture (HMAAC) is proud to present, i found god in myself: a celebration of Dr. Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls, curated by Souleo. The exhibit celebrates the genre bending, award-winning choreopoem/play, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, which debuted on Broadway in 1976.
Through 10 commissioned artworks by artists including Houston native Kimberly Mayhorn, Dianne Smith, Margaret Rose Vendryes and Amber Robles-Gordon the exhibition is a tribute to the Broadway play. Each work honors an individual poem and underscores their enduring significance in highlighting issues impacting the lives of women of color such as sexuality, race, sisterhood, violence and self-love depicted in and inspired by Dr. Shange’s work.
 “This exhibition underscores the conversation Dr. Shange started, extending the legacy and impact of her work into the visual arts medium,” explains Souleo, curator of i found god in myself. “The issues surrounding love, sexuality, gender equality, racial identity, and, ultimately, self-love explored by her work remain relevant today,” said Souleo.
 The exhibition will also include archival material that highlights the creation and evolution of the original text from its 1974 California debut to its Broadway run from the Barnard Archives and Special Collections at Barnard College.

 i found god in myself originally debuted in 2014 at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Long Gallery Harlem (formerly The Sol Studio) and La Maison d’Art. It has since traveled to the African American Museum in Philadelphia and is now presented at HMAAC.

Special programming accompanying the exhibition includes:
Friday, March 10, 6:30-8:30 PM: Opening Reception at HMAAC with curator and select exhibiting artists in attendance. Wine and light fare will be provided.

A full listing of related public programs can be found at www.hmaac.org

Exhibiting Artists: 
Amber Robles-Gordon, Beau McCall, Dianne Smith, Kathleen Granados, Kimberly Mayhorn, Margaret Rose Vendryes, Melissa Calderón, Michael Paul Britto, Pamela Council, and Uday K. Dhar.
###ABOUT HOUSTON MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE 
The mission of the Houston Museum of African American Culture (HMAAC) is to collect, conserve, explore, interpret, and exhibit the material and intellectual culture of Africans and African Americans in Houston, the state of Texas, the southwest and the African Diaspora for current and future generations. HMAAC explores stories inspired by themes of opportunity, empowerment, creativity, and innovation and cultural interrelationships through the lens of the African American experience.

 About Dr. Ntozake Shange:
Ntozake Shange is an American playwright, and poet. As a self-proclaimed black feminist, she addresses issues relating to race and feminism in much of her work.  Shange is best known for the Obie Award-winning play, For Colored Girls.  She has also written several novels including Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo, Liliane, and Betsey Brown. Among her honors and awards are fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Lila Wallace Reader’s Digest Fund, and a Pushcart Prize.
 About Peter “Souleo” Wright:
Peter “Souleo” Wright creates and produces entertaining and informative events, exhibitions, cultural programs and media content. Souleo has collaborated with noteworthy institutions and brands including the New York Public Library, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay & Lesbian Art, AARP, Huffington Post, EBONY and more. Souleo’s work has been widely covered outlets including the Associated Press, NY Times, NBC and more.