Tag Archives: african american contemporary art

NATE LEWIS featured in The Washington Post

30 Mar
March 30 at 9:00 AM

 

Nate Lewis
One of Nate Lewis’s works on display at Morton Fine Art. (Courtesy of the artist and Morton Fine Art)

The photographs of nude African American bodies employed by Nate Lewis aren’t exactly blank slates. The local artist leaves some bodily details — eyes, fingers, nipples — in the pictures he transforms for “Hidden Tensions,” at Morton Fine Art. But Lewis complements the intact bits of flesh with intricate markings, cut into the black-and-white pictures and or added with white ink. The symbols suggest fabric motifs and ritual body paint, but the artist calls them “unseen tensions of the past, present and future.”

Click HERE to view available artwork by NATE LEWIS

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NATHANIEL DONNETT’s “In One Form or Another; Verse One” at Art League Houston through Jan 20, 2018

10 Jan

ON VIEW


In One Form or Another; Verse One
Nathaniel Donnett

Opening Reception: 6 – 9 PM Friday, December 1, 2017
Exhibition Dates: December 1, 2017 – January 20, 2018
Main Gallery

The Homeplace Aesthetic, a lecture by Dr. Andrea Roberts

A Lecture by Dr. Andrea Roberts

Art League Houston is pleased to host ‘The Homeplace Aesthetic: Finding Black Pasts and Seeking Black Futures in Bottom Land’ a lecture by Dr. Andrea Roberts organized by Nathaniel Donnett in conjunction with the artist’s exhibition ‘In One Form or Another; Verse One’ currently on view at Art League Houston.

Within the American landscape, Black vernacular placemaking manifests as spatialized self-determination, intentional design, self-making, and protest. Presently, popular film and TV (i.e., Queen Sugar) express African Americans’ persistent desire to simultaneously return to self-determined, rural settlements while retaining a foothold in urban meccas pregnant with both danger and opportunity. Dr. Andrea Roberts’ research documents and assesses the relevance of rural exodus and return to Black Texas settlements called freedom colonies. Between Juneteenth and the beginning of the Great Depression, Black Texans founded more than 540 freedom colonies. Dr. Roberts partners with grassroots preservationists, descendants of freedom colony founders, who simultaneously call Houston and rural East Texas settlements their homes. Her ethnographic research documents baby boomers’ complex, gendered and raced preservation practices. Of specific concern to Dr. Roberts are descendant communities’ unique approaches to homestead preservation which she calls The Homeplace Aesthetic—the practice of preserving place, reproducing identity, and fostering belonging through commemoration, interior design, and land-based heritage. She concludes the presentation by discussing the implications of the Homeplace Aesthetic for freedom colonies in “bottom land” after Hurricane Harvey.

 

Translation:

Everyday it’s been the same old mess on my block.
You either struggle or you had to protest on my block
Housing discriminatory practice
Homeless people need a loan just to afford a mattress, to sleep on.
On my block they raise ya tax rate up.
The medium income wealth of whites -100k up.
For Blacks, it’s only 1700- straight up.
For Latinos, it’s 2000, nothing I made up.
That’s not an anecdote, that’s racial wealth gap data.
Gentrifying 5th Ward, ‘cause of low social strata.
From the Harlem Renaissance to the Black Arts Movement represented
In black visual arts and black music, performance to literary stations,
Jacob Lawrence Great Migration to mass incarcerations.
On my block, you see aesthetics in vernacular
Architecture, Houston, Texas from West Africa.
On my block, the police will come test you.
4th Ward Camp Logan, Riots at TSU.
So with their protest signs, they formed a line,
3rd Ward marches on Almeda by design.
On my block, Black women strike with labor unions
For higher wages but not treated human.
On my block, systems sustain poverty
Form became protest then became policies.

(Hook)

My block – when everything is everything for sheezy
My block – protest has form, homie believe me
My block – made a lot from a little look easy, fa sheezy
My block – we’ll keep speaking out and speaking freely

Nathaniel Donnett
Verse One – Inspired by Houston based rapper Brad “Scarface” Jordan and the song “My Block”

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Nathaniel Donnett lives and works in Houston, Texas and studied at Texas Southern University. Donnett is the founder of the website blog “Not That But This”. which was funded by a 2015 Idea Fund /Andy Warhol Foundation Grant, 2017 Houston Arts Alliance Individual Artist Grant, 2015 Houston Downtown Vehicular Wayfinding Signs Project public art commission. Donnett has also received the 2014 Harpo Foundation Grant, 2011 Houston Arts Alliance Individual Artist Grant, 2011 Idea Fund/Andy Warhol Foundation Grant, 2010 Artadia Award. He’s exhibited at The American Museum, Washington, DC, The Kemper Contemporary Arts Museum, Kansas City, MO, The Theresa Hotel, Harlem, NY, Harvey B Gantt Art Center for African American Arts and Culture, Charlotte, NC, The Mattatuck Museum, Waterbury CT, The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Houston, TX, Project Row Houses, Houston, TX, Texas Southern University Museum, Houston, TX, The New Museum, NY, NY, The National Museum in Lima, Peru and The Modern Museum of Peru.

Nathaniel Donnett is a recipient of an Individual Artist Grant Award. This grant is funded by the City of Houston through Houston Arts Alliance.

This exhibition is generously sponsored in part by Linda Darke and Greg Shannon.

More about this exhibition at Art League Houston.

Click HERE to view available artwork by NATHANIEL DONNETT.

Contact Morton Fine Art for acquisition.

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, mortonfineart@gmail.com, http://www.mortonfineart.com

New Artwork by MAYA FREELON ASANTE

12 Sep
Morton Fine Art is happy to announce the recent arrival of new tissue paper and ink and tissue ink monoprint artworks by MAYA FREELON ASANTE.
About Maya Freelon Asante:
Maya Freelon Asante is an award-winning artist whose artwork was described by poet Maya Angelou as “visualizing the truth about the vulnerability and power of the human being,” and her unique tissue paper work was also praised by the International Review of African American Art as a “vibrant, beating assemblage of color.” She was selected by Modern Luxury Magazine as Best of the City 2013, by the Huffington Post’s “Black Artists: 30 Contemporary Art Makers Under 40 You Should Know”, and Cosmopolitan Magazine’s “Art Stars” as “the most badass female artists in the biz.” Maya has exhibited her work nationally and internationally including Paris, Ghana, and US Embassies in Madagascar, Italy, Jamaica and Swaziland. She has been a professor of art at Towson University and Morgan State University. Maya has attended numerous residencies including Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, the Korobitey Institute and Brandywine Workshop. She earned a BA from Lafayette College and an MFA from the Museum School in Boston.

Maya Freelon Asante, The Art of Daring Campaign for Cadillac, 2017

 

Maya Freelon Asante, Intuitions, 2017, tissue ink monoprint, 44″x 44″

 

 

Maya Freelon Asante, Transitions, 2017, tissue and ink, 30″x 20″

 

 

Maya Freelon Asante, Synergy, 2017, tissue ink monoprint, 44″x 80″​
(**Not currently housed at the gallery but can be brought in by request)

 

Click HERE to view available artwork by MAYA FREELON ASANTE.

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787

mortonfineart@gmail.com

http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

NATALIE CHEUNG and NATE LEWIS Reviewed in The Washington Post

25 Apr

WASHINGTON POST ~ In the galleries ~ April 21, 2017

 Natalie Cheung: Increments in Time and Nate Lewis: Tensions in Tapestries On view through April 26 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

Natalie Cheung’s “31 Hours,” cyanotype on paper, on view through April 26 at Morton Fine Art. (Natalie Cheung/Courtesy of Morton Fine Art)

To judge by their titles, change must be the subject of Natalie Cheung’s cyanotypes. Each picture in her Morton Fine Art show, “Increments in Time,” is named after a period of as little as one and as many as 76 hours. This is how long it took water to evaporate from the photographic paper, yielding studies in blue, black and white.  The D.C. artist has turned the process, once used for architectural blueprints, into something abstract and unpredictable. Her pictures may resemble Rorschach tests and microscopic views, but all they truly illustrate is the process by which they were made. Their poetry is an accident of chemicals and duration.


Nate Lewis’s “Signals II,” hand-sculpted paper photo print, at Morton Fine Art. (Nate Lewis/Courtesy of Morton Fine Art)

To Nate Lewis, whose “Tensions in Tapestries” also is at Morton, the African American body is a landscape to be transformed. He cuts and scrapes black-and-white photographic portraits, removing pigment while adding patterns and flocked textures. The effect recalls African weaving and skin embellishment, but also reflects the influence of the D.C. artist’s job as an intensive-care nurse, seeking to heal the most damaged. In pieces such as “Funk and Spine,” the surface of a woman’s body is almost entirely remade, yet sinew, bone and essence endure.

– Mark Jenkins

Natalie Cheung: Increments in Time and Nate Lewis: Tensions in Tapestries On view through April 26 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

New Works by NATE LEWIS

11 Apr
Mobile, hand sculpted paper photo print, 40″ x 26″​
We are excited to announce new works by Washington, DC based artist NATE LEWIS. They are from his latest series Tensions in Tapestries
 
We all have a lens through which we see. Our lens is distilled by our patterns of seeing and thinking which continually refines our lens. The lens we come to form becomes our filter.
Using figurative and portrait style images I hand-sculpt patterns and textures on to single sheets of paper that reveal unseen tensions on and within bodies representative of the past, present, and future – the physical and the spiritual, the tangible and intangible. 
Internal, as well as external influences come to refine our patterns of thinking, seeing, interacting and loving. Through the use of presence and absence, textures and distortion, I aim to challenge the filters we hold that dictate our views and our actions.
Through an attentive, intentional process of sculpting patterns and terrains of texture on bodies, I seek for this work to mirror the intentionality and consistency it can take in ones patterns of thinking and seeing to hold an empathetic lens.
-NATE LEWIS, 2017
 
Nathaniel Lewis grew up in Beaver Falls, near Pittsburgh, Pa. Born 1985, Nate benefited from the cultural mix of his Trinidad-born father who was raised in Brooklyn and his white American-born mother, raised in Philadelphia. He graduated from VCU with his BSN and has been a practicing critical care nurse for the past five years as well as professional fine artist. Tensions in Tapestries is Nate’s second solo exhibition at Morton Fine Art.
 
Please find images of the new works below. You can see more of Nate’s available works HERE.

Thrice, hand sculpted paper photo print, 26″ x 40″

Cloaked but Absent III, hand sculpted paper photo print, 40″ x 26″

Funk and Spine, hand sculpted paper photo print​, 40″ x 26″

Archaic Pages, hand sculpted paper photo print, 18″ x 22″

Clenched, ​hand sculpted paper photo print, 14″ x 18″

Conductor, hand sculpted paper photo print, 20″ x 22″

Dignity II, hand sculpted paper photo print, 22″ x 20″

Signals II, ​hand sculpted paper photo print, 24″ x 26″

Unbalanced and Clear, hand sculpted paper photo print, 24″ x 26″

April 2017 solo exhibitions at MFA – NATALIE CHEUNG & NATE LEWIS

31 Mar
Increments in Time
Cyanotypes by NATALIE CHEUNG
Tensions in Tapestries
Hand-sculpted paper photo prints by NATE LEWIS
Friday, April 7 – April 26th, 2015

OPENING DAY RECEPTION 
Friday, April 7th, 6pm-8pm
Both artists will be in attendance.

NATALIE CHEUNG, 53 Hours, 2017, 30″x44″, cyanotype on paper

NATE LEWIS, Mobile, 2017, 40″x26″, hand sculpted paper photo print
EXHIBITION LOCATION

Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009

HOURS

Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm-5pm

About NATALIE CHEUNG and Increments in Time:
Increments in Time features Cheung’s cyanotype mappings of evaporation. Cheung’s cyanotypes are reduced to the essential elements of capturing and recording light;

light, paper, chemical reaction and chance which hearken back to the scientific roots of the medium. The prints record the transition from liquid to blueprint. The title of each work indicates the hours in which it took water to evaporate completely from the paper. What remains is the aftermath of an event, a map. This work examines the way in which nature perpetually creates patterns, seemingly random and chaotic yet with regularity and repetition.

NATALIE CHEUNG, 40 & 31 Hours, 2017, 30″x44″, cyanotype on paper

Natalie was born in Falls Church, Virginia. She received her MFA in Photography from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia and her BFA in Photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, DC. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally; she has been profiled in Washington Spaces Magazine and has her work is represented in numerous collections including the Museum of Fine Art Houston and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. Cheung has taught at the George Washington University as well as the Corcoran College of Art + Design and Temple University, Tyler School of Art. This marks her second solo exhibition at Morton Fine Art.

About NATE LEWIS and Tensions in Tapestries:

We all have a lens through which we see. Our lens is distilled by our patterns of seeing and thinking which continually refines our lens. The lens we come to form becomes our filter. 
Using figurative and portrait style images I hand-sculpt  patterns and textures on to single sheets of paper that reveal unseen tensions on and within bodies representative of the past, present, and future – the physical and the spiritual, the tangible and intangible. 
Internal, as well as external influences come to refine our patterns of thinking, seeing, interacting and loving. Through the use of presence and absence, textures and distortion, I aim to challenge the filters we hold that dictate our views and our actions.
Through an attentive, intentional process of sculpting patterns and terrains of texture on  bodies, I seek for this work to mirror the intentionality and consistency it can take in ones patterns of thinking and seeing to hold an empathetic lens.
-NATE LEWIS, 2017

NATE LEWIS, Thrice, 2017, 26″x40″, hand sculpted paper photo print

Nathaniel Lewis grew up in Beaver Falls, near Pittsburgh, Pa. Born 1985, Nate benefited from the cultural mix of his Trinidad-born father who was raised in Brooklyn and his white American-born mother, raised in Philadelphia. He graduated from VCU with his BSN and has been a practicing critical care nurse for the past five years as well as professional fine artist.  Tensions in Tapestries is Nate’s second solo exhibition at Morton Fine Art.

About Morton Fine Art:

Founded in 2010 in Washington, DC, Morton Fine Art (MFA) is a fine art gallery and curatorial group that collaborates with art collectors and visual artists to inspire fresh ways of acquiring contemporary art. Firmly committed to the belief that anyone can become an art collector or enthusiast, MFA’s mission is to provide accessibility to museum-quality contemporary art through a combination of substantive exhibitions and a welcoming platform for dialogue and exchange of original voice.

MAYA FREELON ASANTE and The Art of Daring

16 Mar

We are very excited to announce that artist MAYA FREELON ASANTE and her brilliant tissue paper and ink artwork has been featured in Cadillac’s new ad campaign “The Art of Daring”!

You can watch the video featuring Maya and her work below:

For Maya’s available works, please visit her page on our website or contact the gallery.