Archive | November, 2017

Save The Date!: JULIA MAE BANCROFT “Mending Moments” Opening

21 Nov

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Save the date for JULIA MAE BANCROFT’s inaugural solo exhibition, Mending Moments, and a holiday open house featuring selected small works by gallery artists!
 
Mending Moments 
A solo exhibition of mixed media works by JULIA MAE BANCROFT 
Saturday, December 9th, 2017 – January 4th, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION
Saturday, December 9th, 2017 from 2pm-6pm 
The artist will be in attendance.

 
 
JULIA MAE BANCROFT, Mamie’s House, 2017, oil, gouache and collage with silk thread embroidery and pressed petals on iron grate, 12″x 11
EXHIBITION LOCATION
Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009

HOURS
Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm-5pm
JULIA MAE BANCROFT,
Garden Party, 2017, ink, oil, gouache and mixed media on paper, 24″x15″   

About Mending Moments
 
Mending Moments is a title that describes both the literal process and the conceptual elements explored in the artwork I make. Using various fibers, mediums and textures, I stitch together layers of imagery, rearranging fragments and binding them back together to form a new ethereal moment for reflection. In this continued series I work to create intimate spaces where we can explore our own layers of memory, perspective, and phantasy.”
-Julia Mae Bancroft, 2017
In this series Bancroft intricately and thoughtfully applies layers of imagery onto paper using oil pastel, gouache, watercolor, various fibers and ink transfers.  Many of the pieces also incorporate embroidery hand stitched directly into the altered surface, complementing the figurative drawings.  The intentional absence of color allows the viewer to focus on the obscured perspectives and depth of texture throughout the narrative.  A typical artwork in her series Mending Moments takes 40-60 hours to complete.  

 
 
  
About JULIA MAE BANCROFT
Born and raised in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, Julia Mae Bancroft grew up deeply inspired by nature. In 2009 she moved to Washington DC where she attended The Corcoran College of Art + Design, graduating with a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts in 2013. Spending a semester abroad living in London England Bancroft first explored interests in fashion design at the Central Saint Martins College of Art + Design. It was here that she began consistently incorporating hand stitching into artwork, incredibly moved by the one-of-a-kind practice of couture embroidery. The discovery of this medium in combination with Bancroft’s background in darkroom photography and painting melded into her current mixed media practice.
About Morton Fine Art
Founded in 2010 in Washington, DC, Morton Fine Art (MFA) is a fine art gallery and curatorial group that collaborates with art collectors and visual artists to inspire fresh ways of acquiring contemporary art. Firmly committed to the belief that anyone can become an art collector or enthusiast, MFA’s mission is to provide accessibility to museum-quality contemporary art through a combination of substantive exhibitions and a welcoming platform for dialogue and exchange of original voice.

For further information, please contact Amy Morton:  

“Abstract Minded” Curator Soiree with OSI AUDU & LAURIE ANN FARRELL at N’Namdi Center for Contemporary Art

14 Nov
N'Namdi Center Logo
spacer.gif
Next Saturday, November 18th join us at a special reception for Abstract Minded.
 Abstract Minded Curator Talk 2-full

Abstract Minded Curator Soiree
with Osi Audu, exhibition curator &
Laurie Ann Farrell, 
curator of contemporary art at the DIA 
Date:  Saturday, November 18, 2017
Time: 2:00pm – 5:00pm
Location: Detroit, MI – The N’Namdi Center for Contemporary Art, 52 E. Forest Ave.

Abstract Minded curator and artist Osi Audu and the Detroit Institute of Arts’ curator and department head of contemporary art, Laurie Ann Farrell discuss the artists, exhibition, and influence of the African Diaspora on contemporary art at this intimate afternoon event.

Refreshments will be served.

Abstract Minded: Works by Six Contemporary African Artists” showcases explorative works by Osi Audu, Nicholas Hlobo, Serge Alain Nitegeka, Odili Donald Odita, Nnenna Okore, and Elias Sime that thematically or conceptually connect to the continent of Africa by pursuing the use of abstraction as a way of engaging the broader conversation about art. The exhibition will be on display through January 6, 2018.

tumblr_oz9kdgcfu41s8qfvio1_1280

Osi Audu
Osi Audu is a Nigerian born artist whose work explores the intersections of scientific, cultural and philosophical ideas about the nature of consciousness. His work, which has been shown in numerous international exhibitions including the Kwangju Biennale in Korea, the Africa Africa exhibition in Japan, and the Museum of the Mind exhibition at the British Museum in London; has also been collected by a number of public institutions such as the Newark Museum in New Jersey, The National Museum of African Art in Washington DC, the British Museum, and the Horniman Museum in London. He has presented papers and talks about his work at several international conferences such as the 16th ACASA International Triennial Symposium on African Art at the Brooklyn Museum, New York; The Human Image conference at the British Museum in London, Conversations with a Continent: FIVE AFRICAN ARTISTS at Columbia University in New York; and Next Wave Nigeria: Artists Dialogue at the Newark Museum. His article –Yoruba Concept of the Mind was published in the 2nd edition of The Oxford Companion to The Mind, edited by Richard Gregory. He was a lecturer in Painting and Drawing at the University of Benin for 9 years, and the Head of Art and Design at Sir Joseph Williamson’s Mathematical School in the UK for 11 years. He received an MFA degree in Painting and Drawing from the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia.  He lives and works in New York.

636153236351952852-laurie

Laurie Ann Farrell
Farrell came to the DIA in 2016 in from the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) where she was executive director of exhibitions initiatives. She directed exhibition programming for the SCAD Museum of Art and SCAD FASH, its museum of fashion and film, as well as the university’s galleries in Atlanta, Hong Kong and Lacoste, France. Farrell is currently an art consultant for the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium Art Collection in Atlanta and curator of the first Rolls-Royce art program in North America.
Farrell has curated exhibitions of work by a diverse group of prominent contemporary artists, among them Marina Abramovic, Doug Aitken, Carrie Mae Weems, Yinka Shonibare, Alfredo Jaar, Michael Joo, Sigalit Landau, Stephen Antonakos, Cao Fei, Kader Attia and Yeondoo Jung.
Farrell was curator of contemporary art at the Museum for African Art in New York City from 1998 to 2007, where she curated the exhibitions “Personal Affects: Power and Poetics in Contemporary South African Art” and “Looking Both Ways: Art of the Contemporary African Diaspora.”
In 2006, Farrell organized American participation at Angola’s inaugural Trienal de Luanda with support and funding from the U.S. Department of State. Farrell received the Abraaj Capital Art Prize with artist Kader Attia in 2010, the ArtTable New Leadership award in 2011 and the Southeast Museum Conference 2015 Museum Leadership Award. Farrell is widely published in art journals and has lectured throughout the Americas, Africa and Europe. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in art history from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Master of Fine Arts in art history and theory from the University of Arizona.



Osi Audu’s curatorial abstract: 

“Abstraction is as indigenous to African visual culture as it is to other parts of the world. The exploration of purely formal elements is not only readily evidenced in the rich traditions of textile designs and other decorative practices from the continent, but is also present in the stylizations of much figurative work from Africa. The six artists in this exhibition, all born and, or raised in countries in Africa, produce work thematically or conceptually connected to the continent by pursuing the use of abstraction as a way of engaging in a broader conversation about art. In our increasingly global existence of the 21st century the world is becoming less and less exotic, and is being experienced more as a sphere of commonalities of being, dreams, fears and aspirations.

Cultural ideas once thought as discrete are now being understood as archetypical, having resonances across the wider world. Aesthetic engagement with form is as important a part of the content of these artists’ works as is their symbolic, historical, socio-political, or conceptual significance.

Among the many questions raised by this exhibition, the overarching one must be the dialectical question:

what is contemporary African art?

Abstract Minded: Works by Six Contemporary African Artists is not simply about looking for the African in African art, it is also about taking a look at what some African artists are doing today in order to get a fuller sense of the current ‘state of things’ in contemporary African art.”  –


Don’t miss the Curator Soiree happening next Saturday, beginning at 2:00pm at the N’Namdi Center!


The N’Namdi Center for Contemporary Art presents diverse, multi-disciplinary and engaging art experiences. It serves to promote and perpetuate the cultural legacy of African-American and African diasporic art, along with art from diverse cultures. Since its conception in 2010, the N’Namdi Center has contributed to the Detroit arts scene by presenting art exhibitions by nationally and internationally renowned artists as well as local and emerging talent.

The N’Namdi Center’s work is based on two core beliefs: that the arts can play an integral role in the revitalization of Detroit, and that a thriving creative community depends upon the participation of a diverse group of artists, organizations and individuals. The N’Namdi Center builds on these beliefs by acting as a catalyst in the development of Detroit’s creative ecosystem, with a continuing focus on African American art and community engagement through the arts.

KESHA BRUCE’s iconic (Re)calling & (Re)telling series featured in Rethinking Schools

8 Nov

Congratulations to Morton Fine Art’s KESHA BRUCE for having four images from her iconic (Re)calling & (Re)telling photo series featured in “Black is Beautiful” by Kara Hinderlie in Rethinking Schools!

 

 

 

Click HERE to view available artwork by KESHA BRUCE.

 

 

 

NATE LEWIS featured in Lancaster Online

2 Nov

November 2, 2017
Mosaic Project artist Nate Lewis uses his experience as a nurse in his art

man

Most artists know from the time they are little kids that they will become artists.

Nate Lewis, one of this year’s mosaic artists at Pennsylvania College of Art & Design, knew from the time he was a child that he wanted to be a nurse, like his dad.

He had no idea that his nursing career would become the foundation of his art career.

I was planning to be a nurse since sixth grade,” says Lewis, who grew up in Beaver Falls in western Pennsylvania. “I got good grades, and I played lots of basketball. I didn’t grow up making art at all.”

Lewis will talk about his nontraditional journey as an artist Friday at 2 p.m. And from 6 to 7 p.m., the public can meet Lewis during a First Friday event.

And his exhibit will be on display through Dec. 8, along with one by fellow mosaic artist Amber Robles Gordon.

Music was the first foray into art for Lewis.

“Coming out of college and into my mid-20s was a time where I listened to everything,” he says. “The music spoke to me so much in so many different ways.”

He started playing violin, taking about 8 or 9 lessons and then teaching himself.

“I played two or three hours a day,” Lewis says. “The way I am, when I really like something, I dive in.”

+2 

Selfie

He moved to Virginia and started working in the intensive care unit of a hospital. Required to take some classes, he started doodling when class got too dull.

This wasn’t actually a breakthrough for him. It was just doodling.

But then his sister, who is a visual artist, saw something in those doodles and for Christmas 2010, she bought him some art supplies and a book about drawing.

“My sister told me to draw what was in front of me, but I found it boring. I knew that I wanted to draw organs and instruments, red blood cells, images from an electronic microscope. That was my world.”

He drew lungs coming out of a trumpet, red blood cells coming out of a pipe.

“I loved it. This is exactly what I wanted to draw.”

His sister loved the images, too, and suggested they make T-shirts.

While he spent his spare time working on the T-shirts, he missed drawing his unique images. So he quit the T-shirt business and began working on his drawings. Two cross-sections of brains that looked like headphones. A bagpipe sitting on top of a stomach.

He was still working in the hospital, where he moved from neuroscience-surgical intensive care to medical-surgical intensive care and to a stroke unit, where he was involved in rehab.

+2 

nate lewis

And his work evolved from the basics of anatomy to a deeper, more intense kind of work.

He began exploring and working with layers of paper, specifically paper from MRIs and CAT scans.

“I was thinking of the rhythms and records of people’s lives. I thought about vulnerability, empathy and care. You’ve got such an intimate relationship with patients and family members. I don’t think I will have a more intimate relationship. These are vulnerable and tragic times for people.”

As art took over his life, Lewis stopped working as a nurse and now devotes himself to exploring new ideas and expanding on older ideas.

“I wanted to add life to my work, not just the hospital,” Lewis says, noting that he has been influenced by his brother-in-law, who is also a visual artist.

Lewis is now thinking about history and African-American figures and narratives.

“I’ve started using African-American figures and thinking about empathy and what is empathy outside of the hospital. Empathy is not a passive thing. It is very active. So I am educating myself on unknown histories, with things I have been unaware of.

“I’m adding life to movement and then I am thinking about textures in bodies. Tensions past, present and future.”

He will keep evolving.

“As time goes on, I try to understand more and more by using empathy, understanding and caring,” Lewis says. “My work was physically taking care of people, and I see everybody with this lens.”¶