Rosemary Feit Covey’s 500 piece collection at Georgetown University Library

19 May
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Rosemary Feit Covey’s 500 piece collection at Georgetown University Library. This collection encompasses the entire graphic oeuvre from 1967 to 2010 of the South African-born artist Rosemary Feit Covey. Including some 500 works, the collection was amassed over several decades by Eric Lansdowne Mackenzie and generously donated to Georgetown University Library in 2011.  Mackenzie had published the catalogue raisonné of Covey’s graphic work the previous year, and the descriptive information in these Digital Georgetown records is drawn from his catalog.

 

Encouraged as a high school student by the renowned wood engraver and illustrator Barry Moser, Covey began working in the challenging medium of wood engraving in 1975. The stark linearity and rich darkness of this expressive medium can heighten the psychological effect of the subject and proved the ideal medium for Covey’s imagery. She found that the act of carving into wood required a level of concentration and effort that “drew from a deeper reserve” than the act of painting. Through this intensely physical process she was enabled to bring more deeply felt imagery to the surface, drawn from memories of her youth or daily experience.

Rosemary Feit Covey is a prolific, award-winning artist who maintains a working studio at the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, Virginia. From 2007 to 2008, Covey served as Artist-in-Residence at Georgetown University Medical Center, and in 2014 she had a major retrospective at the Johns Hopkins University’s Evergreen Museum and Library. Her work is represented in the Smithsonian Institution and the New York Public Library, among other public collections.

 
Morton Fine Art
1781 Florida Ave NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart.com
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