Archive | March, 2016

ANDREI PETROV’s solo exhibition “Global Migration” opens 4/8/16 at Morton Fine Art

31 Mar
Global Migration
Abstract Oil Paintings by ANDREI PETROV
Friday, April 8th – April 27th, 2016

OPENING DAY RECEPTION 
Friday, April 8th, 6pm-8pm
The artist will be in attendance.
Great Escape 30x48 web
ANDREI PETROV, Great Escape, 2016, 30″x48″, oil on canvas
EXHIBITION LOCATION

Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart@gmail.com
HOURS

Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm

Sunday 12pm-5pm

Far from Home 36x55 diptych web
ANDREI PETROV, Far from Home (diptych), 2016, 36″x55″, oil on canvas
About ANDREI PETROV & Global Migration

“The forced displacement of millions of people from war torn homelands and border crossings into unwelcome arms has inspired these painted reactions.
In this series the vast color fields show the paths of these voyages through streams or patches of creamy impasto. Within unpredictable atmospheres, traces of movement crawl across, around and through layers of opalescent layers of transparent color. The contrast in scale between the rivers of thick color and the expansive land that surrounds them symbolizes how small the masses are in respect to the immense distances traversed.” -ANDREI PETROV, 2016

Based in New York City, ANDREI PETROV explores memory in his organic abstract paintings. His paintings probe the distortion, incompleteness and rare moments of clarity in the shadows of memory. Each piece portrays the intrinsic struggle and selective inclusion or exclusion of details in the process of recollection. At times, sharpness occurs in the rear of the picture plane while the out of focus, obscured areas, exist in a larger scale toward the foreground and make reference to the inscrutable nature of long and short term memory.Petrov’s paintings have been exhibited nationally and internationally in prestigious collections and can be viewed at The Four Seasons Hotel in both Washington, DC and Punta Mita, Mexico, The Fairmont Hotel in Chicago and The Conrad Hotel, Miami. His paintings have also had cameos in the following films, The Royal Tenenbaums, Autumn in New York, Kate and Leopold, The Business of Strangers and Words and Lyrics. He is the featured visual artist 2016 for Music@Menlo.

Global Migration marks ANDREI PETROV’s forth consecutive solo exhibition at Morton Fine Art.

About Morton Fine Art
Founded in 2010 in Washington, DC, Morton Fine Art (MFA) is a fine art gallery and curatorial group that collaborates with art collectors and visual artists to inspire fresh ways of acquiring contemporary art. Firmly committed to the belief that anyone can become an art collector or enthusiast, MFA’s mission is to provide accessibility to museum-quality contemporary art through a combination of substantive exhibitions and a welcoming platform for dialogue and exchange of original voice.

NATE LEWIS solo “Biological Tapestries – 1st Movement” opens 4/8/16 at Morton Fine Art

29 Mar
Biological Tapestries – 1st Movement
Sculpted Paper Photo Prints by NATE LEWIS
Friday, April 8th – April 27th, 2016

OPENING DAY RECEPTION 
Friday, April 8th, 6pm-8pm
The artist will be in attendance.
cloaked in fratres forever grateful web

NATE LEWIS, Cloaked in Fratres Forever, 2016, 40″x26″, sculpted paper photo print

EXHIBITION LOCATION

Morton Fine Art (MFA)
1781 Florida Ave NW (at 18th & U Sts)
Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart@gmail.com
HOURS

Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm

Sunday 12pm-5pm

save me this time web

NATE LEWIS, Save Me This Time, 2016, sculpted paper photo print

About NATE LEWIS & Biological Tapestries

“Biological Tapestries is a visual reflection of the competing elements of genetics, the microbiological world, human intervention through medical care, and appeals to the divine which all have a stake in determining the outcome of patients in critical care units.
As a critical care registered nurse I desired to become emotionally porous. I sought for the impersonal experiences of patients and families to become personal and intimate. This resulted in distilling untested qualities of my character and further illuminating areas of my identity.
Through sculpting landscapes of moving textures and patterns on bodies, I attempt to make visible the unseen tensions and competing elements within the bodies that mirror the internal transformations of the patients, the individuals emotionally invested in these patients and myself.
I aim for this work to show the power of freedom within boundaries, and to question to what lengths are we willing to lay aside our pride, comfort, and fear to make room for empathy, within intimate and larger social contexts.” -NATE LEWIS, 2016
 
Nathaniel Lewis grew up in Beaver Falls, near Pittsburgh, Pa. Born 1985, Nate benefited from the cultural mix of his Trinidad-born father who was raised in Brooklyn and his white American-born mother, raised in Philadelphia. He graduated from VCU with his BSN and has been a practicing critical care nurse for the past five years. He planned to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a certified nurse anesthetist.
In 2013, he started exploring the use of diagnostic electrocardiogram paper in his work, which led him to a more focused study of paper itself. He began sculpting individual sheets of white paper into 2-3d forms. He then started blending his unique approach with paper sculpture to photos. Within the first year and a half of showing his paper sculptures, he has exhibited in Washington DC, New York, Miami, and San Francisco.

Biological Tapestries – 1st Movement marks his first solo. He is represented by Morton Fine Art in Washington, DC.

About Morton Fine Art
Founded in 2010 in Washington, DC, Morton Fine Art (MFA) is a fine art gallery and curatorial group that collaborates with art collectors and visual artists to inspire fresh ways of acquiring contemporary art. Firmly committed to the belief that anyone can become an art collector or enthusiast, MFA’s mission is to provide accessibility to museum-quality contemporary art through a combination of substantive exhibitions and a welcoming platform for dialogue and exchange of original voice.

 

OSI AUDU in the Village Voice

17 Mar

village voice.png

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Osi Audu was born in Nigeria in 1956, and his shape-shifting drawings derive partly from the Yoruba concept that the human head encompasses a duality of spirit and matter, mind and body. Combining layered graphite and fathomless black pastel edged with sleek white lines, each of Audu’s renderings oscillates between a depiction of an empty and oddly shaped container — imagine a hatbox with tendrils — and a space-warping geometric abstraction. The graphite planes shimmer like sheet metal, seemingly enclosing dark expanses rimmed with light.

Osi Audu, Self Portait No. 42, 15"x22.5", graphite on pastel on paper

Osi Audu, Self Portait No. 42, 15″x22.5″, graphite on pastel on paper

Segueing between three-dimensional representation and vivid graphic design, Audu’s work encourages mind games that summon unexpected allusions. With its cartoonish curves, Self-Portrait No. 57 (2015) recalls the line drawing Alfred Hitchcock made of himself for his television show, which, during the opening titles, would be filled with the director’s own shadow. Audu delivers a similar sense of disembodied animation, flummoxing the brain as his velvety surfaces dazzle the eye. Some future production of Hamlet could up the metaphysical ante by using one of these drawings as a stand-in for Yorick’s skull.

Click HERE to view the full article.

Click HERE to view available drawings by OSI AUDU.

Contact Morton Fine Art with acquisition inquiries.

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, mortonfineart@gmail.com, http://www.mortonfineart.com

KESHA BRUCE’s “Magic Spells & Reminders” reviewed in the Washington Post

16 Mar
the washington post logo
March 4, 2016
Kesha Bruce

A pair of paintings from Kesha Bruce’s previous Morton Fine Art show hang alongside the current one, “Magical Spells and Reminders.” These renderings of mystical “guardians” are precursors of two newer pictures of silhouetted patchwork figures that wear crowns. But the recent work is in a different style, and most of it is not figurative. Instead, it emphasizes what the Arizona-based artist calls a “personal, magical alphabet” that developed from her drawings. Among the glyphs are a teardrop shape and a cross with arms of equal length.

The latter is featured in “The Crossroads,” a potent collage-painting that is mostly in bloodlike shades, with white and black marks and glittery areas. The mixed-media piece began, as did the others, with bolts of cloth from a defunct Seattle upholstery factory. The artist painted and cut the material, assembled the roughly rectangular scraps and then painted some more.

The process yields works that suggest both mid-20th-century abstraction and traditional hand-printed fabrics. Bruce’s symbols are new to her, but they tap into something ancient.

Kesha Bruce: Magical Spells and Reminders On view through March 17 at Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave. NW. 202-628-2787. mortonfineart.com.

keshabruce_2016_010 The Crossroads 60 x 48 web

Kesha Bruce, The Crossroads, 2016, 60″x48″, mixed media on canvas

Click HERE to view available artworks by KESHA BRUCE.

Contact Morton Fine Art for acquisition information.

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, mortonfineart@gmail.com, http://www.mortonfineart.com

 

ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY’s “North Pole Series”

15 Mar
 
About ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY’s “North Pole Series”-
Visiting the North Pole is a life changing experience. Seeing vastness of the ice flow and lonely pursuit for food of the polar bear is very different from seeing the usual frolicking bears in picture postcards. It is a majestic and unforgiving environment.
The five large ice panels in the series, combine wood engravings, painting and plastics to create an abstracted version of the arctic landscape.  Several smaller pieces depict the bears themselves. The use of plastics to create this series of work was included as both a relevant, thematic and artistic decision.  Plastics are oil products and both literally (floating around in the water) and in terms of drilling raise issues of global consequence. Transparent sheets of plastic and store carry bags add texture and layering. Producing a  translucent  quality which adds surface interest and the effect of light on the ice and water. – ROSEMARY FEIT COVEY, 2016
 

 
Polar Bear
Wood engraving , acrylic paint, Japanese paper on canvas
30 x 20 inches
 

 
Sole Swimmer (3 panels)
Acrylic paint, Japanese paper, plastics on canvas
42 x 36 inches each panel

 
Black Ice (5 panels)
Wood engraving, acrylic paint, plastic on canvas
72 x 30 inches each panel
 
Please contact the gallery for higher resolution images as well as with any inquiries or requests.
Morton Fine Art
1781 Florida Ave NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 628-2787
mortonfineart@gmail.com

WILLIAM MACKINNON sold out show “Internal Weather” featured in The Adelaide Review

10 Mar

the adelaide review

William Mackinnon Exhibits Internal Weather

William-Mackinnon-Slow-Down-Detail-Adelaide-review

In his latest exhibition, Internal Weather, which sold out pre-opening, William Mackinnon uses scenes of landscapes combined with observations from everyday life to convey the feeling of what it’s like to be in the world now and more specifically what it’s like to be Australian.

“I really want to get across my experience and the feelings associated with these places,” Mackinnon says. “It’s not really representational of a place; it’s almost more a psychological feeling of going somewhere or leaving.”

The works carry with them a sense of nostalgia as Mackinnon is interested in his own personal experiences of the world. He uses the local scenery of places like Lorne where he has had a beach house for 15 years, as a starting point, adding elements from TV and advertising.

For example, travelling to Los Angeles influences the work Strange Country. The black silhouettes represent trees as seen from the Eames house looking through to Malibu Beach and the cartoon-like, or collage-looking, trees are inspired by Lorne.

“It’s trying to capture the complexity of the experience of all these things – the simultaneity of what it is to be alive,” Mackinnon says. “Although it’s a seemingly beautiful picture, there are rips in the water and the sun is incredibly hot.”

Other works such as The Great Indoors (ii), Summer in Mullimbimby is a painting of a friend’s house where he has stayed a number of times.

“It’s stuff we have an emotional investment in; it’s not an inanimate house.”

The image is immediately familiar and captures the essence of summer.

William-Mackinnon-The-great-indoors-ii-Mullimbimy-768x858

The Great Indoors (ii) Mullimbimy

The works are deliberately unpolished with Mackinnon particularly interested in the natural evolution of the paintings. He doesn’t know how they are going to turn out; he starts off with an idea and each day a new part develops.

“I like there to be a record of all the decision-making and the indecision and the thinking,” he says. “I want all that life and energy and the accumulation of time to be evident.”

Mackinnon describes his earlier work as being much more eclectic with lots of different influences, but over time his work has become more personal.

“I’m much more interested in what’s immediately around me and what’s inside my head and combining those two things. This show really is a good example of that.”

For Mackinnon, painting has always been the main medium and he prefers to work on a large scale, as the viewer can’t look at it all at once.

“I’m trying to communicate a feeling and the curiosity of looking,” he says. “I want the viewer to enjoy the playfulness of the quality of the paint and the scale. Also, to see the works beautifully lit in a gallery is a nice experience and it can’t be beaten.”

William Mackinnon
Internal Weather
Hugo Michell Gallery
Until Saturday, March 12
wmackinnon.com

 

Title image: William MacKinnon, Slow Down (Detail)

CHARLES WILLIAMS’ “Day Time” triptych arrives at Morton Fine Art

8 Mar

New oil on panel paints by artist CHARLES WILLIAMS. These new artworks are stunning, and the perfect complement to his “Nighttime” series which were included his September 2015 solo “Swim” at Morton Fine Art, in his traveling museum solo exhibitions, and at Aqua Art Miami.

 

CHARLES WILLIAMS, "Day Time 1", 12"x12", oil on panel

CHARLES WILLIAMS, “Day Time 1″, 12″x12”, oil on panel

 

CHARLES WILLIAMS, "Day Time 2", 12"x12", oil on panel

CHARLES WILLIAMS, “Day Time 2″, 12″x12”, oil on panel

CHARLES WILLIAMS, "Day Time 3", 12"x12", oil on panel

CHARLES WILLIAMS, “Day Time 3″, 12″x12”, oil on panel

 

Please contact Morton Fine Art for available artwork by CHARLES WILLIAMS.

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787

mortonfineart@gmail.com

http://www.mortonfineart.com