Creating an appreciation for Arts – A Multi-Generational Approach

14 Jul

Creating an appreciation for Arts 

By Martina Dodd

We may not have all grown up around art or been born into a family of artists and creatives like Maya Asante Freelon and William Mackinnon, but that shouldn’t stop us from surrounding our family with paintings, photography and sculpture. Creating an appreciation for the arts at a young age not only improves observation and cognitive skills but can also enhance a child’s understanding of history and culture.  Trips to museums and visits to art galleries with your family can be a rewarding experience for you as well.  A child’s perspective of a piece of art can sometimes be even more inspiring than an art historians!  So let their imagination run free, especially with series drenched in memory, spiritual connects and self-discovery like Kesha Bruce’s “The Guardians” or Maya Freelon Asante’s “Handmade”.

Kesha Bruce, Soliis Journey Home, 48"x48", mixed media on canvas

Kesha Bruce, Soliis Journey Home, 48″x48″, mixed media on canvas

 

Maya Freelon Asante, Handmade, 36"x37", tissue ink monoprint

Maya Freelon Asante, Handmade, 36″x37″, tissue ink monoprint

 

Parents and educators can also use art as a fun and creative teaching platform.  Through Victor Ekpuk’s use of Nsibidi, an indigenous African system of writing, a child can be introduced to cultural traditions and new ways of communication.

Victor Ekpuk, Asian Uboikpa (Hip Sista) Series #11, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 60"x48"

Victor Ekpuk, Asian Uboikpa (Hip Sista) Series #11, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 60″x48″

Or they can learn about the brightly colored deep sea animals and florescent habitants which inspired some of Julia Fernandez Pol’s paintings.

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5"x18.5", bas-relief hand painted monoprint

Julia Fernandez Pol, Reef Series 8, 23.5″x18.5″, bas-relief hand painted monoprint

 

With the help of Andrei Petrov you can also teach a geography lesson based off of pieces like “Istanbul” and “Swiss Bliss” which loosely resemble European landscapes.

Istanbul Not Constantinople  30x48

Andrei Petrov, Istanbul, 30″x48″, oil on canvas

 

Andrei Petrov, Swiss Bliss, 42"x42", oil on canvas

Andrei Petrov, Swiss Bliss, 42″x42″, oil on canvas

 

 

By instilling an interest, understanding and love for art who knows what the next generation of artists and collectors will create or develop? And maybe during your next visit to Morton Fine Art they can help pick out your newest piece of art work!

Morton Fine Art, 1781 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

(202) 628-2787, http://www.mortonfineart.com, mortonfineart@gmail.com

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